How Social Media Actions Within Relationships Build Trust

There seems to be a new round of social scoring and now “trust” based sites that purport to either determine a persons social influence or business trustworthiness. As if we did not have enough of these sites already, it seems every geek that can code is trying to jump into social media software to try to get a piece of the pie in this ever-growing industry.

Social Media TrustSeeming to coincide with this new rush of social media influence and trust score platforms are some bloggers telling people to shut up about them. Not to stop talking about them because they are tired of it, but telling people like me that are highly skeptical of such services ability to accurately measure social and e-commerce influence and trust into a score to shut up. Really?

“Actions Within Relationships Build Trust, not easily manipulated false scores.” #quote @fondalo

  • Actions that result in trust with your online community are what is important.
  • Real results, actions and revenue are the measurement of trust and value you deliver to your community.
  • Relationships that go beyond conversations with your peers is what truly measures your successful social media marketing.
  • The right social relationships that are earned through proper actions will result in something well beyond an inaccurate score, something that imparts monetary value to both you AND your community.

I was approached a couple of times recently regarding a newer social scoring site. One conversation went something like “I think u would want to because #TrustCloud is like your online credit score. They evaluate profiles & give u a score.” To which I replied, “No algorithm can do that. A credit score is based on your payment history. These social scores can easily be manipulated.”

So let me be very clear. I will not shut up about easily manipulated social media influence scoring sites like Klout, Kred and the like. I will continue to preach real results and help guide my audience to things that will help them achieve those results in their social media marketing efforts. I will continue to battle against all efforts by those people in this industry that have high scores, but no real results to show for it.

Dare I say that ROI matters? You need a return on your investment of time and resources from your social media management that goes beyond your ego and the perception others have of you because of your score!

If your social media marketing success story is about your book, seminars and speaking revenue covering the social media industry, that does not qualify you to preach the validity of scores to a restaurant, entrepreneur or brand. Having done social media marketing successfully for one does. I can and have “gamed” these scoring platforms to get my score to increase. Doing so has always resulted in a reduction in “real” effectiveness and results.

Focus on your actions within your social relationships, so your social media marketing achieves a clearly defined goal, not a high Klout score that doesn’t buy groceries!

By Robert Caruso
@fondalo
http://fondalo.com
Founder/CEO – Bundle Post

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18 Comments

Filed under Community, influence, Klout, Marketing, Relationship, Social Media, Social Media Marketing, Social Media ROI, Strategy, Uncategorized

18 responses to “How Social Media Actions Within Relationships Build Trust

  1. Love! I agree with you about the social scores. I got rid of my klout account when they were changing the algorithm every other time I turned around. And if I’m going to be penalized for interacting with those deemed “less influential” than I, then go for it. I love the people I meet via social media and gain something from all of them, no matter who they are. I love interacting with them and developing REAL relationships. It makes me happy that I can go into any corner of the world and know someone to have coffee with. :-)

  2. Reblogged this on Hudson Valley Social Media ~ Christine Skulevold and commented:
    Focus on your actions within your social relationships, so your social media marketing achieves a clearly defined goal, not a high Klout score that doesn’t buy groceries!

    Great advice by Robert Caruso!

  3. Amen! Social scoring is the worst, it’s a system that can be gamed thus proving it’s irrelevance.

  4. I am always studying and trying to learn because I don’t have budget to do my work for me. I do social media for a car dealership. I’m not trying to sell cars, I sell the owners love of the local community. The outcome is that people really want to do business with likable locally minded businesses so in fact we sell many more cars. I have klout and that stuff I just never visit them and couldn’t tell you what my scores are. You touched on something that made me want to comment.
    “If your social media marketing success story is about your book, seminars and speaking revenue covering the social media industry, that does not quality you to preach the validity of scores to a restaurant, entrepreneur or brand.”
    As I study, I have noticed countless “experts, gurus” etc who are only selling their own greatness. Their message: “I’m so great and I’ll teach you how to be great like me! Trust me I’m soooo great, great, great, great!” They either have 10,000 fake followers on twitter or 27 likes on facebook (like who doesn’t check that?!) There’s no message. They might as well be selling used socks. (It is kinda fun when they call me on the phone-I ask questions they can’t answer-it’s kinda mean but yet a little funny)
    I say all that to say this Robert; of the few fine folks out there who are the real deal & walk the walk- you are one of them. I appreciate every bit of wisdom that I can glean from those few who are real. Thanks!

  5. I used to videotape weddings for a living. When I hired people to help me the first thing I noticed was: having a degree in filmmaking made you no more or less qualified to shoot an event. It was all about interacting with people. The technical side of operating a camera can be easily taught, but getting along with the clients, venues and other vendors was what really mattered.
    My experience taught me that often times some mechanical thing will go wrong. A camera will malfunction, the itinerary will change or you’ll get a flat tire on the way to the reception. If you have established a good relationship with the other individuals involved, you have leverage to “make it right”. If for one reason or another, you couldn’t get enough footage of the bride before the ceremony, you could talk to the photographer, because you’ve become his friend, and he’ll give you the stills to use in a pre-ceremony photo montage. Or since you got to know the DJ by name, if you need a few minutes to set up before they announce the newlyweds into the room, she’ll “hold the curtain” so that you’ll be ready to get the entire first dance on film.
    What I’m saying is this: genuine relationships are much more valuable than a degree from a university. Caring about other people will get you a lot farther than being able to prove you got enough credits to graduate.

  6. Walking the talk, brother! That’s one of the things I like best about you. It’s amazing how many ‘silver bullets’ there are out there. In the end, time, energy, and hard work are what give lasting impressions and make people want to work with us.

  7. Pingback: Social Media Is More Than Business – Today Its Relationships

  8. Great post robert!

    Our problem is that we run after numerical figures not after caring about people. Many people still love to see high klout scores and thinks that their social media compaign is moving greatly and expect good ROI. LOlxx :D. This is ridicolous.

    Its time to rethink and come back to the basics that is to serve people and add value in their lives.

    Thanks.

    • Definitely agree Adil. That’s something we have always done, continue to do and have the results to show for it. But it all stems from having a clear goal/objective that frames all of the activity, engagement and value we deliver. Those are the methods, not the focus. :-)

  9. Margi Kenny

    High numerical scores often equal high and mighty egos-that’s it.

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