Tag Archives: Audience

How To Know Your Social Media Content Strategy Isn’t Working

Determining what isn’t working within your social media marketing strategy is imperative. Your content strategy is often one of the areas that is off, and the reason your efforts are thus far in vain. If you don’t have a proper social media content strategy it will affect the rest of your social media marketing results. Identifying the key indicators pointing to what’s not working is extremely important.

Social Media Content StrategyWhat are a few of the signs that the content strategy you are using with your social media marketing isn’t working?

1) No Shares – One of the biggest things you should be seeing that will validate the topics and content you post about are shares. If you’re not getting a fair amount of RT’s and shares of the content you curate, post and create, your content strategy is missing the mark.

2) No Engagement – When your community likes and comments on the content you are posting to your streams, you can infer that the content types and topics you are posting about is resonating. But lets be very clear here. I said likes AND comments. A subtle thing many miss is that likes without comments is not a good indicator of relevance. You’re looking for both likes and comments that show your content strategy is connecting with your audiences interests.

3) No Clicks – One thing that is often overlooked is the measurement of traffic to YOUR websites, landing pages and content. When you have nailed a curation and creation content strategy, you will be providing consistent content that resonates with your audience and opens interest in content you create and more importantly an openness to investigate what you and/or your company actually does. If your social media posts about you and your services aren’t generating traffic, it’s a good indication that nobody cares what you post.

4) No Leads/Sales – At the end of the day, social media marketing needs to be about results. It needs to be about more than just clicks, engagement, likes and community size. If your content strategy is working and you have speaking to the proper audience with the content you curate and create, it will lead to conversations and then relationships.

Earning relationships should be your focus from the beginning. Providing selfless value through content posting, content creation and shares will open conversations with your community. As those conversations increase, relationships are formed, thought leadership is established and relationships grown. Through those relationships you will also generate inquiries, leads and revenue.

If you have the proper content strategy in place and are doing the proper activities surrounding what you post, likes, comments, conversations, clicks, traffic, relationships and sales are the result.

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Filed under Community, Content, Curation, Engagement, Marketing, Relationship, Results, Social Media Content, Social Media Marketing, Strategy, Uncategorized

The Drastic Difference Between Social Selling And Spam

Social Selling continues to gain popularity as a term and an action within the social media marketing space. Social selling has many definitions, but I like the one by @JulioVisko in a Social Media Today article from 2012 that says “staying connected with your prospects and build a relationship with them that goes beyond a vendor toward a trusted advisor.” The key word here is relationship, not selling, something often misunderstand by online marketers and brands alike.

Correct me if I am wrong, but we are all experiencing an increase in Social Selling VS Spamwhat I consider to be the opposite of social selling, under the guise of the often misunderstood phrase. Many newer social media applications are gaining popularity that purport to “find prospects that need your product/service and automate or suggest responses” that supposedly increase “engagement” and sales. Sounds really good, doesn’t it? Not so fast.

All, if not most of these applications are developed by gear-heads that have incredible programming skills, but little to no social media marketing experience or understanding. What results is the numerous @ mentions we are all experiencing when we tweet a specific word or phrase from brands, marketers and twitter accounts we have had ZERO engagement with. It’s simply a search for and respond with function that fills the social graph with noise, frustration and inappropriate sales messaging that has nothing to do with social.

Recently I had a Skype call with the CEO of one such technology company. The demo and call didn’t go very well as you can imagine, and actually degraded into an argument over what social media marketing actually is. This brilliant programmer’s company has tons of logo’s of major brand customers and news sites “validating” how awesome his technology is, which magnifies the problem even further. The individual argued that it is perfectly fine for brands and marketers to use technology to find “prospects” and @ mention them with a specific offer of their products, even if they have never followed, engaged or connected with the twitter account previously.

Well, I vehemently and respectfully disagree. Where I come from, we call that spam. You know, the unwanted and unrequested direct contact by a person or brand you don’t know, soliciting a product or service you did not want information about. Easily recognized in our email inbox, yet regrettably it is overlooked as acceptable by the inexperienced in social media.

What is social selling and how do you do it properly?

In a word, social selling is relationships. It is derived from connections and conversations within social networks with prospects for your products and services that start and end around building a long-term relationship. It is providing selfless value to your prospect community and earning the opportunity to “pitch” what you do.

Can you target prospects in social selling?

Absolutely you can and SHOULD! Use tools, searches and hashtags to find your target audience or prospects that need what you do, then connect and communicate with them about anything other than what you do. Show interest in them and what they do and most importantly ensure that the content you are sharing is interesting and relevant to THEM, not exclusively pitching what you do.

Social selling and spam are at opposite ends of the spectrum of effective social media marketing.

One is targeted, sustainable and long-term, one is not.

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Filed under App, Brand, Community, Hashtag, Marketing, Relationship, Social Media, Social Media Marketing, Social Selling, Spam, Twitter

Interview with @BryanKramer about #H2H, Social Media and @BundlePost

H2H_eBook_cover1This week I had the pleasure of sitting down with Social Media author, speaker and Bundle Post Pro user Bryan Kramer of Pure Matter to discuss the human, emotion and successful factors of social media marketing. As a Pro user of Bundle Post, Bryan gives his perspective on social media changes, content curation, the human elements and the unique capabilities that the Bundle Post social media tool gives him and his team.

Find out why Bryan is a Pro user of Bundle Post, how he uses the application to make himself “look smart” and save a ton of time.

Grab a chair and listen:

Here are some of the highlights of the interview:

- The Book Human to Human – Comes out in book form this week. Grab a copy here.

- It’s ok to make mistakes and be really human and authentic in social media.

- The H2H model is even resonating with the big brands. Listen to hear some examples such as Oracle.

- Businesses don’t sell to businesses. “You have to sell to a person.”

- Bryan got started curating and sharing in social media.

- Bryan references being a Connoisseur. I found this great blog he wrote that details this awesome logic. Read it here: Collector or Curator? Becoming a Social Connoisseur

- Content curation is just as important as blogging!

- If you’re curating unique stuff, you don’t have to worry about growing your community, building thought leadership or getting results.

- You can’t be everything to everyone. People like people who share things that are interesting to them. Share the best content!

- “It was almost over night that I fell in love with the Bundle Post product.”

- “I enjoy using anything that makes me look smart. Bundle Post makes me look smart and it cuts down on my time requirement.”

- “I have a family, a business, launching a book and speaking. How am I going to do all this stuff? That’s why I like your product because I can do something in 30 minutes for a week worth of posts.”

- “Bundle Post is like RSS/Feed Reader on I can organize, auto-hashtag and share it out..”

- “I really think everyone can use Bundle Post. Who really doesn’t have a problem with time? Everyone that’s online struggling with time to curate. Executives are perfect for this.”

- Bundle Post helps you easily stay top of mind with your audience.

We’d like to thank Bryan for taking time out of his schedule to talk to us about his great book and his use and view of Bundle Post. Connect with Bryan on Twitter at @BryanKramer.

*We want to be very clear that Bryan is not being given his Pro account, not even a discount. He upgraded his Bundle Post account to Pro and pays for it like our other users. The value and results of the technology speaks for itself.

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Filed under Bundle Post, Content, Curation, Social Media, social media automation, Social Media Content, Social Media Marketing, Twitter

The Most Overlooked Social Media Success Method

As a social media software firm, we spend a considerable amount of our activity within the social graph. We are constantly engaging in conversations, evaluating metrics and reviewing people’s streams and profiles. As a part of this normal process we and many of you engage in regularly, we began to notice things that though subjective, provide valuable insight on social media success.

Or dare we say, lack thereof.

Social Media ConsistencyThe most glaring thing we are noticing is a lack of consistency on the part of many social media “professionals, consultants and agencies”, as well as the average SMB brand. What do we mean by lack of consistency?  Every single day we see social media accounts that RT or comment on one of our posts, then upon reviewing their stream we find they only post a few times per week (if that) and most of their status updates are responses or RT’s of other people’s posts.

Here is a theory we have formulated and have deployed for many years in this industry:  Proper Activity Leads To Results

The most overlooked successful activity in social media is activity itself! Consistent, daily activity…

You’ve heard the phrase “Out of sight, out of mind” haven’t you?  In fact we hear from our users and brands that we consult that “just the consistent hashtagging and posting of relevant content all day, every day using Bundle Post results in a major impact in clicks, traffic, conversations and relationships”.

In social media marketing, consistency merges with activity to drive results. Given that you have a proper strategy of topics and subject matter your audience finds interesting and relevant, and you combine that with a consistent stream of curated content, engagement and conversations, you get results. If there is no consistency and therefore sporadic activity or the wrong activity, results decline or are non-existent. It really is that simple.

What does consistency look like?

1) Freeway – If you were to think of a social network newsfeed or timeline as a freeway and all the cars flying by on that freeway to be status updates, you would understand the importance of consistency much easier. You see, social network users do not stand at the side of the freeway all day long, every day. In fact they show up on the side of the freeway, logout, come back again later and so on.

If you do not have enough consistent, valuable content (status updates) in your stream every day, very few are seeing your cars driving by. Even worse, you are not providing any value to your audience that have connected to you and therefore you are completely out of sight and out of mind to your audience.

If however, you have a consistent stream of shared, curated and created content in your streams every single day from morning until night (at appropriate levels for each network), you begin to attract conversations, shares and likes of the content you are posting. In turn, the conversations and shares around your posts build relationships that can turn into sales, web traffic and real results.

By increasing the quantity and quality of the posts you make every single day, you also increase your overall reach, clicks, shares and conversations that your social media marketing will achieve. As long as you are not just sharing about you or throwing up a ton of “mud on the wall”, hoping it sticks, but rather are consciously understanding your audiences interests and posting the topics that drive them online, it becomes a numbers game at a certain appropriate level, your results increase.

Quantity + Consistency + Quality =  MORE Reach, Likes, Shares, Clicks, Traffic, Engagement and Relationships (Real Results)

2) Engagement & Response - When you pivot to achieve the posting consistency mix correctly, the next consistency requirement to focus on is Engagement and Response. If you think of engagement as outreach to your audience and response as what it sounds like, then you might have an idea of what we are discussing here.

Consistently look for opportunities to START conversations, share content from and otherwise engage with your community. Likewise you should consistently respond to comments, conversations, shares and other activity that your target audience does to amplify your content, message or posts. These are the activities that build relationships and earn your brand the right to discuss what you do within your community.

Consistency is the most overlooked and underutilized success method in social media marketing. Merging these consistency elements into your daily activity will completely transform what you currently realize in results.

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Filed under Bundle Post, Community, Content, Curation, Engagement, Marketing, Social Media, Social Media Content, Social Media Management, Social Media Marketing, Strategy

I HATE #FollowFriday ’s – How To Make Them Effective by @PerfectJulia

Should start by explaining what #FollowFriday is. In a nutshell it was not created by Twitter but by it’s users. Every Friday people suggest certain followers in their network to other followers in their network by using the hashtag #FF or #FollowFriday. An introduction so to speak.

Every Friday morning I feel the love pouring through my laptop from Twitter with mentions containing words like, Smart, Savvy, Funny, Fun, Knowledgeable, Awesomesauce, Mentor, Friend, Favorite. All of them have the hashtag #FF attached to them, designating that they are Follow Friday mentions.

Hate Follow FridayHow could someone hate that? Well, there are other people that are Smart, Savvy Funny, Fun etc that are attached to same exact tweet. Yes, a group of fellow Twitter users that are also smart. Imagine that. As many users that will fit in 140 characters that is. I think it is far less effective and beneficial when someone places a bunch of people in the same tweet that are from the same industry or the town. These kinds of Follow Friday posts are the ones that have made many dislike the practice altogether, since they feel there’s little value in recommending a bunch of Real Estate agents, for example all in one tweet. Many just don’t appreciate that, and I certainly understand why.

Most people like me, value their time! Every Friday morning being bombarded with tweets that show no real value can be considered a waste of time to many. You have to respond to everyone and say thank you, not to mention the computer and mobile app notifications ringing all day long.

The question I always ask myself is what am I saying Thank You to exactly? Especially when it’s the same people every single Friday. If you want to add the most value to your #FF posts, get rid of the multiple twitter handles in the tweet and just talk about a specific person. Tell your followers why you think people should follow THAT specific person, brand or account. Take the time to get to know the people you mention and what they’re about. To say that @PerfectJulia is favorite says nothing….. please elaborate as WHY I’m a favorite of yours and give me a real reason to say Thank You!

I can imagine some of you are now deleting me from your follow Friday list, but before doing so please hear me out.

I’m a meat and potatoes kinda girl… Forget the fluff and give me the steak! When attaching the hashtag #FF to a tweet that means you are introducing and more importantly recommending someone to your network. I expect a WHY I should follow that person. Make sense?

Imagine if you’re a small business owner and another small business in the same town with a nice size following gave you an unsolicited promotional shout out with a #FF. You could not hate that could you?? I know I would not hate it at all. In fact you could do it every single Friday as far as I’m concern and mostly likely I would certainly do the same in return.

So when you use Follow Friday mentions, be sure that you are adding value to the person you mention and give people valid reasons they should follow them too. Why? Because then it means something and delivers something.

Eyeballs, trust, recommendations, click through traffic, targeted follower increases, etc.

Now if you need a place to store all these #FF shout outs and easily schedule them out, then Bundle Post has a Follow Friday feature that is perfect for this! It becomes a repository of all your Follow Friday posts, giving you the ability to edit them at any time to shake things up if you like. Once the data entry is done it takes simply a couple of seconds to make edits, hashtag and schedule them out every week. The Follow Friday feature in Bundle Post can also be used for other shout outs like a #MarketingMonday list or say #WW for #WineWednesday, as well. Or create something new. The possibilities are endless!

Give your following a real reason to say “Thanks a million for the #FF mention!” and give your followers the reasons they should follow them too!

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Filed under Brand, Bundle Post, Hashtag, Marketing, Social Media, Twitter

Hey Facebook – Instead Of Repeating Posts I’ve Already Liked, How Bout…

Facebook Newsfeed IssuesYesterday morning I was catching up on my far too many, overnight Facebook notifications. As I finished my follow-up on comments, likes and tags I attempted to whirl through my newsfeed to see what everyone was up to. Scrolling, refreshing and opening various pics and articles I began to consciously notice something that I have unconsciously been aware of for several months. Repeated status updates in my feeds. Have you noticed this?

“I have a really good idea Facebook. How bout instead of putting hundreds of updates in my newsfeed that I have already seen/liked, instead you put the content from all those pages I have liked that you say can’t fit in my stream anymore because you can only display a certain amount of posts everyday in a users newsfeed… ‪#‎Rocketscience‬”

Example:

Facebook Newsfeed Issues1Just this morning as I was wrapping up this short post, I liked and commented on this graphic in my newsfeed by @AnyaDowning. It wasn’t 40 minutes later when the image I had already seen and engaged with was back at the top of my newsfeed. Really?

I have shared this YouTube video a lot recently, because it really breaks down the issues Facebook has really well. It will give you a really good perspective on what’s happening and why.

If there really was an issue with too much content and status updates that are relevant for users that Facebook page owners and brands need to pay Facebook to access users they have already paid to acquire, why are we being shown the same content over and over in our feeds? Shouldn’t Facebook show us the content from the pages we have liked instead of this useless duplication?

This among many reasons is why I think brands, marketers and social media agencies need to reevaluate their Facebook and over all social media marketing strategies. Not the WHAT or HOW, but the level of involvement using Facebook pages. Increasing activity and effectiveness on other social networks where your audience is at the highest concentration makes a lot of sense, even outside of the recent Facebook mess.

And here’s a another question for Facebook…  Do you realize that you are killing yourself?

For more on my thoughts on this and what you can/should be doing given the changes to Facebook, read Facebook Declining Page Reach: 9 Experts Weigh In

What are YOU doing differently with Facebook pages?

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Filed under Agency, Content, Facebook, Fanpage, Marketing, Social Media, Social Media Marketing

Use Content Curation To Create Brand Advocates That Sing Your Song

Brand advocates develop within social media marketing, regardless of the size of your business, when multiple components converge to fill the needs of your target market. These needs differ related to the products and Brand Advocateservices you offer, the value they provide and the problems they solve for your customers. However, outside of your product offering, social connections begin to turn into brand advocates as you consistently and effectively deliver selfless value to them before, during and after the sale.

How do you recognize a brand advocate?

The Most Common Traits of a Brand Advocate:

1) They read and share the content you create frequently.

2) They share and comment on the content you curate regularly.

3) They often become customers of your company. (but not always)

4) They tell others about your product/service/content openly and often.

That value you deliver to your audience initially comes in the form of the content you share in your streams, through content aggregation, content curation and content creation. Let’s start by defining the difference between these three, as aggregation and curation are often incorrectly considered as the same.

Aggregation: Finding and collecting content to share

Curation: Editorializing and commenting on aggregated content when you post/schedule it.

Creation: Developing your own articles, graphics, videos and other content, specifically for the online and social media marketing benefits.

When you effectively aggregate, curate and create the content that your audience finds valuable, they will like, share and comment more and more frequently. The difference between making your social media marketing successful and a community full of brand advocates is what you do, or don’t do next. This is where most big brands fail miserably.

When your social media posts have intent and strategy behind them which resonate with your audience the shares, likes and comments roll in. Acknowledging these and moving them into conversations and ultimately real relationships is where everything we have discussed thus far becomes meaningful. There are very few brands that garner brand advocacy on the substance of their products and services alone. Brand advocacy comes from the relationships forged before, during and after the sale that takes a customer from someone who is just a customer to one that advocates for your brand on and offline. Do you see the difference?

Some Of The Benefits of Brand Advocates:

1) They expand your reach on and offline to their friends, customers and communities.

2) By expanding your reach to their communities and advocating your brand, they help you grow your community.

3) They help you organically and virally increase your sales and revenue by way of exposure, testimonial and conversation.

Content Curation SongSo where does the song reference come in from the title of this post? This week, the graphic on the right came in from one of our Pro users, @C4Compete. She wrote (or changed) a song based on the 12 Days of Christmas and turned it into the 12 benefits of Bundle Post. Unsolicited and out of the blue…

We have found that delivering value through our social media content strategy of aggregation, curation and creation, coupled with the users of our technology loving the value of the product and how we conduct customer service, results in not just brand advocates, but advocates that create content about us. That’s right. They write blog posts that mention Bundle Post. They create videos and graphics that promote Bundle Post.

When your social community begins to be made up of true brand advocates and customers that spread your message and promote your brand and products, I can assure you that you are delivering selfless value to them that is paying off in sales and revenue.

How does your content curation work together with your social media management to foster brand advocates to sing your brand song?

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Filed under Brand, Content, Curation, Marketing, Relationship, Social Aggregation, Social content management, Social Media, Social Media Content, Social Media Management, Social Media Marketing

4 Reasons Why You Need To Get To Revenue With Social Media Marketing

I speak to a lot of people in this business on a daily basis. Whether it is online, in the social graph, on the phone, video chat or in person, many businesses using social media have a hard time getting to revenue. You know cash, money, moolah. Making any kind of Social Media Revenuerevenue from their efforts, regardless of whether it is profitable or not seems to be a missed focus that means everything for your business.

Let me clear here, whether you’re a social media agency, a start-up, an author, a small brand or anyone else using social media for marketing, you need to just get to revenue. There is no more important reason for spending the time, effort and resources in ANY medium if you don’t generate revenue. Though branding, relationships and a host of other reasons are valid for maintaining a social presence, none of them trump revenue.

If you are not yet seeing revenue from your efforts or are not focusing on revenue FROM your social media management, you are missing out on four important points:

1) Revenue tells you what’s working

If what you are doing in your social media marketing is actually working, it will generate sales, clients and revenue. If it is not working properly, you will be focusing your time on watching metrics of clicks, follower counts and engagement. All of these are important, but only when they are achieving the net results of revenue.

2) Revenue gives you resources

If you are generating revenue, you are gaining resources. When you are gaining resources you have more options to expand what is working, add valuable tools and get more support from others within the organization. Everyone wants to be involved with something getting results. Nobody wants to be associated with something that is failing or only sucking resources.

3) Revenue gives you momentum

Along with additional resources, obtaining revenue with your social media marketing builds momentum, both internally and externally. When customers start buying, they also start talking about it. This adds to the revenue momentum.

4) Revenue gives you the best measurement of real results

Nothing better than revenue will confirm real results. By getting to revenue with your social media marketing quickly, it will confirm you have the right message, target audience and strategy.

So those are just four of the reasons you really need to get to revenue with your social media marketing right now! HOW to get to revenue is a very different question that has so many variables which include industry, audience and products. Since these are totally different for every single person and company using social media for marketing, it is nearly impossible to give a company specific plan of action in a blog post.

Here are a few points and a process that may focus your efforts in the direction you need to go.

Social Media Content And The Social Selling Process [INFOGRAPHIC]

The Social Selling Process

1) Provide Selfless Value – in the content you create and curate. Earn the right to pitch your products and services by being selfless.

2) Be Consistent – with your content posting, engagement and responses.

3) Target Audience – Be sure you know your target audience and what they are interested in.

4) The Right Relationships – Focus your time, effort and conversations on your target audience, not with your peers.

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Filed under Agency, Content, Curation, Engagement, Marketing, Relationship, Results, Social Media, Social Media Management, Social Media Marketing, Social Media ROI, Strategy

When Facebook Research Asked Me About Pages And What I Wished I Could Say

Facebook Survey EmailYesterday I received an email from Facebook Research requesting that I complete a survey to provide my thoughts and views on Facebook Pages. At first I was excited to be able to tell them what they really needed to hear. Quickly my hopes were dashed as the questions were largely irrelevant to the actual issues facing Facebook users and especially marketers.

After some cursory questions about how often I am on Facebook and a range of options for how many pages I like the survey stated – “we’d like to ask you some questions about Facebook pages. ” Given the recent discussions about the substantial problems marketers are encountering with the controlled reach and paying for boosts and ads, I thought maybe they were starting to hear the noise and potentially interested in getting real input, so I made my selections and clicked next.

In this series they seem to trying to determine the emotion behind a page like. The questions are structured in a way that doesn’t allow the answer to actually get to the core of their reasoning however. Based on the way the question was structured, I was forced to select the most extreme options for options two and three.

FBSurvey1

In the next question series appears to be trying to figure out how to increase the number of likes on pages and how easy the respondent feels it is to find pages.

FBSurvey2

This question really requires context and comment fields to really provide proper feedback. Another indication that the survey was not really trying to understand pages and users input. How could you answer whether Facebook pages post high quality updates?? The question is so general. Some do, some don’t.

FBSurvey3

To me, this next question was full of duh moments and then hyper news and local focused. A clear trend that we are going to continue to see in our newsfeeds. News and local…

FBSurvey4

The second to the last question finally got down to some important matters. Clearly they are trying to determine their algorithm acceptance with respect to the levels of different kinds of content in the streams of users.  My answers specifically attempt to get the message across that there is a substantial dissatisfaction with content coming from Pages and Brands I like.

FBSurvey5

I missed the screen shot of the last question and was unable to go back to it. The final question was:

How satisfied are you with Facebook pages:

My answer was – Very dissatisfied

What I wished I could say to Facebook:

Facebook Flies on the wallIt is my opinion that Facebook is making a very grave error with their business and revenue models. They are alienating their page owners by dramatically restricting their ability to reach their fans any longer without constantly paying for boosts and ads. I do not fault Facebook for their desire and frankly need to become a business and scales revenue, however I do completely disagree with their method of doing so. The average SMB (small or medium business) is not going to keep paying for something with diminishing returns, nor should they.

By restricting the previous value of pages to marketers of all sizes, Facebook is setting the stage for a collapse of the Facebook page model and pushing both users and marketers to other platforms, not to mention opening the door to competitive platforms to fill the hole Facebook itself has created. Facebook needs to quickly realize that what they are doing will eventually lead to even larger brands and social media agencies and marketers to abandon the page model and THAT will result in a mass exodus of everyone else.

I previously wrote about a better revenue and results model that Facebook should implement that addresses all parties concerns. Read:  Solution To Facebook’s EdgeRank, Revenue And Stock Price Issues for my insights on this issue way before these changes started to take hold.

What are your thoughts on how Facebook is managing revenue and page reach?

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Filed under Agency, Content, EdgeRank, Facebook, Fanpage, Marketing, Results, Social Media, Social Media Management, Social Media Marketing

The 5 Most Important Components Of Social Media Content Strategy

When it comes to social media strategy, there is nothing more important than the content element. Often misunderstood or even over looked, content curation is crucial to establishing selfless, relevant value in your stream that sparks conversation, engagement Social Media Strategyand a positive response with your target audience. When it comes to content posting in social media, there are many components that need to work together for the best results and we are going to cover those, as well as the most frequent mistakes that cost marketing results.

The 5 most important content strategy components:

1) Topics – Before you start posting and sharing content for your social media accounts be able to answer a very basic but incredibly important question: What are the 3-5 topics your audience is most interested in when on social media? These are the topics that need to dominate your news feeds.

2) Consistency – No matter when someone steps to the side of the freeway, they need to see you and value coming from your feed. This means EVERY day, ALL day. Consistency increases the speed at which you can make meaningful connections.

3) Frequency – Think of social media posts as cars on a freeway and your audience as standing on the side of that freeway watching the cars go by. You have to have enough cars on the road so your cars are seen. Social media users don’t stand there watching all day long, they login and log off with tremendous frequency. Your content curation and marketing posts need to be on the freeway all day, every day.

Example: Twitter posts per day should be at or above 20 posts.  Yes I said 20. And that’s a minimum bar…

4) Timing – Do you know what time of day your audience is most active on social media? You should not only know this, but you should be posting more frequently during those time periods.

We use a tool called Tweriod to determine these times on Twitter. We have found that they tend to also hold true across the other platforms like Facebook and Linkedin, etc.

Social Media Posting Times

5) Content Mix – Be sure that 80% of the posts you’re making on social media is curated content that is not yours or about you. 20% of what you share should be your content or marketing posts that are about you.

We believe these are the top five content strategy components that you need to understand and use properly if you expect to be effective with your social media management.

Conversely, here are 3 of the biggest mistakes marketers make with respect to their social media posting (in no particular order):

1) Grouping posts  - This is a failing I see quite often in social media. Sending a ton of posts grouped together right after another with little posts/value before or after is not effective. I see this on Instagram and other platforms as well. Now we are all busy, but this kind of laziness will ultimately have the opposite effect. Meaning people will start to ignore all your posts because of this practice.

2) Retweeting only – There are many people out there that have no content strategy of their own and simply RT or share other people’s posts. Again, this is not a strategy, well it’s not your strategy anyway. It is you executing many other people’s strategies that is not going to establish any thought leadership or results.

3) Not enough – Probably the biggest shortcoming I see is folks just not posting frequently enough. Remember that the social network user is not logged in all day long watching your feed. They login, log off various times all day long. If you are post <20 times per day on Twitter and <5 times per day on Facebook, etc. nobody is seeing anything you are sharing.

4) Over self-promoting – At this point this should be obvious common sense to most, but unfortunately it isn’t. If you are posting more that 15-20% in your feeds about YOU, you either have an ego problem or don’t understand social media marketing yet. Provide selfless, relevant value in your streams and you will earn the right to pitch what you do.

5) Nothing human – People connect with people, not brands and logo’s they’ve never heard of. Be human and approachable. Pretending you are some big company, being sterile and corporate-like in your feeds will not build relationships.

In social media marketing content is where everything starts. If you intend on getting the best results understanding what content drives your audience, the proper quantity and timeliness of that content in your streams and consistency are what get conversations and relationships happening. This is where traffic, revenue and ROI comes from.

What components are you executing with your social media content strategy?

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Filed under Content, Curation, Facebook, Marketing, Relationship, Results, Social Media, Social Media Content, Social Media Management, Social Media Marketing, Social Media ROI, Strategy, Twitter