Tag Archives: Facebook

Facebook Announcing Plan To End Pay To Play For Pages – A Dream?

Facebook Pay to PlayYes, most likely it IS a dream. But since Facebook is about to release an earnings report this month on the 23rd, I believe it will be the peak of their revenue climb with this pay to play shift and that by the end of the year we will begin to see a dramatic decline in revenue and page activity if they stay the course.

But in a perfect world, I would love to see a $12.1 Billion revenue announcement that consisted of a new monthly page fee. Why? It would mean that they came to their senses and realized that the current pay to play model they have implemented is not sustainable as a business model and page owners, managers and brands are fleeing the Facebook platform for greener pastures. It would also mean that they have further had a reality check and finally understood social media marketing, their users and customers in a real way.

I previously wrote a piece before Facebook enacted the Pay to Play business model that included what I believed to be a better solution to their then EdgeRank Newsfeed algorithm, stock price plummeting and revenue model challenges.

Since then Facebook deployed what has come to be known as their “Pay to Play” requirement, that I believe is a completely unsustainable revenue model and one that delivers zero benefit to users, marketers or Facebook itself over the long run. This is backed up by a recent eMarketer report showing organic reach declining at an increasing rate. Diminishing returns the platform can and will deliver to brands, marketers and page owners. I decided to do some deeper research and have put together basic financials that compare what Facebook is currently doing as compared to what I propose, and the compelling differences between the two.

But before I get into that, let’s take a peek at some of Facebook’s 2013 Public Business Highlights:

Revenue for the full year 2013 was $7.87 billion, an increase of 55% year-over-year.

Income from operations for the full year 2013 was $2.80 billion. (advertising revenues)

Net income for the full year 2013 was $1.50 billion.

Free cash flow for the full year of 2013 was $2.85 billion.

Facebook currently has 54.2 Million active pages.

Facebook has 25 million small business pages.

Removing Pay To Play and Replacing It With Monthly Fees:

I went ahead and ran some numbers using my plan and compared the results with what Facebook is currently doing. This plan is predicated on Facebook displaying all page posts to newsfeeds, similar to friend posts. If they abandoned their unsustainable Pay to Play model and instead adopted my page monthly fee model, the revenue improvement to Facebook is massive and the benefits to page owners, marketers and end users is even bigger! Facebook Revenue Plan By the numbers:

  • I am factoring a little more than half of pages would participate and pay the monthly fee, remaining an active page on Facebook.
  • Small business pages would pay a small $30/mo fee, other smaller pages a $20/mo fee, non-profit and charities only $10/mo and larger big brand pages an average of $200 per month.
  • Ad revenue would still be a factor for Facebook and actually become even more valuable since you know you would be able to reach new likes that you add to your page with this new model. I pegged the ad revenue much lower to take into account the changes to the model though.
  • New 2014 annual revenue jumps from $2.8 billion to $12.1 billion under my plan – a $9.3 billion improvement over 2013!

Benefits of the Monthly Page Fee Model:

Newsfeeds would be competitively driven Facebook users would control what content they want with the power of their like/unlike

Focus would shift to creating and sharing great content and that would drive the newsfeed

The playing field for SMB’s would be leveled against Big Brands wouldn’t have a substantial advantage because of their huge budgets Efficiency/Result value would shift to time spent creating content rather than managing ad systems

So many more benefits, but you get the idea

The BIG Winners:

Users – They see content from pages they liked and wanted content from to begin with. Users would power the Facebook page success model, rather than big brands and/or budgets.

Marketers – Can access the likes they already invested heavily to obtain. The nominal monthly fee makes it a very viable marketing platform again.

Facebook – Duh. HUGE revenue win for Facebook and a lot of good will earned for listening to its users and developing an alternative that benefits everyone. (there’s a first for everything) Everyone wins! Tell me what your thoughts are on this alternative monthly fee model for Facebook Pages? What do you like, dislike or wish Facebook would do?

————————————–

a P.S. for those that enjoy those.

Here Are Just A Few Problems with the current Pay To Play Model:

Not sustainable – In another post I did some time back I discussed “By restricting the previous value of pages to marketers of all sizes, Facebook is setting the stage for a collapse of the Facebook page model and pushing both users and marketers to other platforms…”  When you require people to reach the audience they have already spent a ton of time and effort to establish, and many paid Facebook for ads to do this, then you change the game and require them now to also pay to reach them, nothing but diminishing returns will occur. If Paying for page reach via ads is the only method available, the expertise and time requirements to make that successful in a diminishing return environment pushes many right out of the market.

Users are the losers – They are not seeing the content from pages they liked and want content from.

Money, NOT content drives pages success

Not a level playing field – Most small and medium businesses can’t compete with big brands for eyeballs on the platform effectively.

Diminishing Returns –  The current model will continue to decline in results, rather than improve return and value to business stakeholders. It’s pretty simple to determine the long-term outcome of something with diminishing returns.

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Filed under Brand, Content, EdgeRank, Facebook, Marketing, Pay to Play, Retweet, Social Media, Social Media Marketing

Where Social Media Brands, Marketers And Agencies Spend Their Time [REPORT]

We recently conducted a survey of social media marketers, brands and agencies to better understand where they spend their time and the challenges they are facing with their social media marketing. The 11 question survey consisted of multiple choice questions, as well as multi-part questions that asked the respondent to rank their agreement with specific comments/challenges of content, social marketing and curation. With hundreds of respondents completing the survey, we decided that there is a lot of relevant information that others in the industry could learn from, so we will be writing several posts about the data.

For this post, we are going to focus on the main activity and use of time questions we asked.

Question 1:  HOW MANY DAYS PER WEEK DO YOU SCHEDULE CONTENT FOR YOUR SOCIAL MEDIA STREAMS?

This question was crucial to understanding the level of experience of the survey respondents. Those of us in the industry for some time, we understand the importance of consistent, relevant content in all social media streams on a daily basis, all day long. In asking this question we learned that the majority of the survey respondents are heavily active with scheduled social media scheduling and a small percentage of respondents are less experienced.

82% of those surveyed stated that they schedule social media posts three or more days per week. A huge number, no doubt, but what we found most interesting is that a huge majority of almost 66% schedule content five or more days per week for their social streams.

Days You Schedule Social Media Posts

We believe that this information is showing that if you are not scheduling content for your social streams at least 5 days per week, you are likely getting lost in the noise of those that are, or at least you are sitting at your desk everyday manually live posting content to your streams.  These numbers are inline with our philosophy that social media is like a freeway and you have to have enough cars (content) on the road everyday to be seen, let alone effective.

Question 2:  ON AVERAGE, HOW MANY SOCIAL MEDIA POSTS TO YOU SCHEDULE EVERY DAY ON TWITTER

58% of social media marketers stated that they schedule more than five posts per day on Twitter and over 35% schedule more than 10 posts. Given that Twitter is a much more active posting site this was not a surprise.

Twitter is a unique social network in that updates are displayed only at the time they are posted, whereas Facebook for example will display content in the newsfeed over and over based on when users login and how well an update is engaged with by your friends/followers. Since Twitter is void of such an algorithm and posts scroll based on when it was posted, not how much engagement the post receives, posting much more frequently is imperative.

Posts Per Day On Twitter

Posting enough content on a daily basis to Twitter is crucial to growing a targeted audience, sparking engagement and building relationships. You want to be sure that whenever your audience happens to login and check their streams, they see something of valuable and interesting from you. This builds thought leadership, creates opportunities for sharing and conversations, which is what results in ROI.

Question 3:  HOW MANY HOURS PER DAY DO YOU SPEND FINDING, EDITING, SCHEDULING AND POSTING CURATED AND MARKETING CONTENT TO YOUR SOCIAL MEDIA ACCOUNTS?

When we asked how many hours per day these social media marketers spend managing and scheduling content, an astonishing 75% said two hours or more. That’s two or more hours every single day managing curated and marketing content for their social streams.

Hours Scheduling Social Media Posts

The question that should also be asked is, if you are spending 2-5+ hours per day managing your social media posts, what are you not doing that could be getting real results? Engagement, conversations and relationship building are all going to suffer if this much time is required everyday managing scheduled posts and marketing content.

Let’s be clear, you have to have relevant, valuable content in your streams and you also have to post updates about you, your products and what you do in an appropriate mix. If you have little or nothing in your streams, you will not get engagement. Without likes, comments and conversations it is impossible to build relationships on and offline. Without relationships your social media marketing has no foundation and will not achieve real results. It’s a quandary isn’t it?

The challenge facing the social media agencies, marketers and brands we surveyed and the millions of others around the world is that much of the time spent everyday on social media marketing is unproductive time. This survey shows that much of the time and effort doing social media marketing is spent in the back office finding, managing and scheduling content, rather than in conversations, relationship building and other functions that lead to revenue and ROI.

With the thousands of tools and applications on the market that are designed to help with these tasks, why are so many still dealing with this time/effort mismatch? We believe the answer is that most of the tools available aid with some of the curation and scheduling tasks, but few actually impact efficiency enough to make a substantial difference. Therefore, we see the answers to the survey still showing an incredible amount of time and effort being spent in the back office.

Read about 8 new ways content curation and social media marketing just got easier. That’s where Bundle Post makes a massive impact.

In our next post, we will unveil additional eye-opening details of this survey and give you a lot more data on what social media challenges marketers say they have today.

The second second survey report post is now out – The Importance And Challenges Of Content Curation

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Filed under Agency, Brand, Bundle Post, Content, Curation, Engagement, Marketing, Relationship, Results, Social content management, Social Media, social media automation, Social Media Content, Social Media Management, Social Media Marketing, Twitter

Hey Facebook – Instead Of Repeating Posts I’ve Already Liked, How Bout…

Facebook Newsfeed IssuesYesterday morning I was catching up on my far too many, overnight Facebook notifications. As I finished my follow-up on comments, likes and tags I attempted to whirl through my newsfeed to see what everyone was up to. Scrolling, refreshing and opening various pics and articles I began to consciously notice something that I have unconsciously been aware of for several months. Repeated status updates in my feeds. Have you noticed this?

“I have a really good idea Facebook. How bout instead of putting hundreds of updates in my newsfeed that I have already seen/liked, instead you put the content from all those pages I have liked that you say can’t fit in my stream anymore because you can only display a certain amount of posts everyday in a users newsfeed… ‪#‎Rocketscience‬”

Example:

Facebook Newsfeed Issues1Just this morning as I was wrapping up this short post, I liked and commented on this graphic in my newsfeed by @AnyaDowning. It wasn’t 40 minutes later when the image I had already seen and engaged with was back at the top of my newsfeed. Really?

I have shared this YouTube video a lot recently, because it really breaks down the issues Facebook has really well. It will give you a really good perspective on what’s happening and why.

If there really was an issue with too much content and status updates that are relevant for users that Facebook page owners and brands need to pay Facebook to access users they have already paid to acquire, why are we being shown the same content over and over in our feeds? Shouldn’t Facebook show us the content from the pages we have liked instead of this useless duplication?

This among many reasons is why I think brands, marketers and social media agencies need to reevaluate their Facebook and over all social media marketing strategies. Not the WHAT or HOW, but the level of involvement using Facebook pages. Increasing activity and effectiveness on other social networks where your audience is at the highest concentration makes a lot of sense, even outside of the recent Facebook mess.

And here’s a another question for Facebook…  Do you realize that you are killing yourself?

For more on my thoughts on this and what you can/should be doing given the changes to Facebook, read Facebook Declining Page Reach: 9 Experts Weigh In

What are YOU doing differently with Facebook pages?

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Filed under Agency, Content, Facebook, Fanpage, Marketing, Social Media, Social Media Marketing

The Same Power That Got Twitter To Revert Block Policy Can Make Facebook Change

By now you have heard of the Thursday night Twitter fiasco related to changing their blocking policy. The announcement caused immediate and social-wide outrage and contempt for the now publicly traded company.

Social PowerI even tweeted “I CANNOT believe @Twitter changing their block policy. Is every CEO of every social network losing their minds? We will NOT stand for this!”, referencing the continual Facebook decisions that are negatively effecting millions of business pages as well.

Didn’t hear about the situation? Here’s story from via Yahoo News.

Things declined rapidly, quickly causing Twitter to take action and revert back to the old Blocking function. An update here

This is an incredible event that shows how clearly the power of the social network user has to influence the networks and “push back” on the things that negatively effect users, brands and marketers.

The important point here is that this same power and influence can also be used with our buddy Zuck of Facebook. The “pay to play” advertising and post boost requirements for pages to see any reach and effectiveness on the platform is counterproductive to social networking, social media marketing and all other facets of the industry in general. (click to sign the petition at the bottom)

Should there be costs associated with social media marketing? For sure! But they need to be implemented the right way, that doesn’t negatively effect users and brands alike. How? I previously wrote a post that outlines this plan, but in short; a nominal monthly fee for pages. Simple, clean and huge revenue opportunity for Facebook with a once loved and effective platform in tact.

So there is an opportunity, right now! Right now, to conduct a similar effort with Facebook that yields similar results as was accomplished on Twitter. On the heels of this victory, the people together should stand up and let Facebook know they will not stand for the changes they are making. Right now, we should impact the other major social network positively for users, brands and marketers alike.

When discussing this in the social graph last night, one of my friends said the “Zuck is really stubborn”. To which I replied, “Stubbornness is easily effected when you are public and groundswell becomes tidal wave.”

So I say grab your surf board and lets ride this tidal wave and instead of the Arab Spring, it can be call the Social Winter.

What say you?

**Update**

After a lot of suggestions and requests, I have started a petition. Since Facebook is not a public company, something like this making the news (as with Twitter) is not at all a good thing and they would have to address it. If we could get 50,000 Marketers and even Facebook users to sign this, the story would get picked up and force Facebook to respond and deal with it.

Here’s the petition and link.

Facebook Petition

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Filed under EdgeRank, Facebook, Social Media

The 5 Most Important Components Of Social Media Content Strategy

When it comes to social media strategy, there is nothing more important than the content element. Often misunderstood or even over looked, content curation is crucial to establishing selfless, relevant value in your stream that sparks conversation, engagement Social Media Strategyand a positive response with your target audience. When it comes to content posting in social media, there are many components that need to work together for the best results and we are going to cover those, as well as the most frequent mistakes that cost marketing results.

The 5 most important content strategy components:

1) Topics – Before you start posting and sharing content for your social media accounts be able to answer a very basic but incredibly important question: What are the 3-5 topics your audience is most interested in when on social media? These are the topics that need to dominate your news feeds.

2) Consistency – No matter when someone steps to the side of the freeway, they need to see you and value coming from your feed. This means EVERY day, ALL day. Consistency increases the speed at which you can make meaningful connections.

3) Frequency – Think of social media posts as cars on a freeway and your audience as standing on the side of that freeway watching the cars go by. You have to have enough cars on the road so your cars are seen. Social media users don’t stand there watching all day long, they login and log off with tremendous frequency. Your content curation and marketing posts need to be on the freeway all day, every day.

Example: Twitter posts per day should be at or above 20 posts.  Yes I said 20. And that’s a minimum bar…

4) Timing – Do you know what time of day your audience is most active on social media? You should not only know this, but you should be posting more frequently during those time periods.

We use a tool called Tweriod to determine these times on Twitter. We have found that they tend to also hold true across the other platforms like Facebook and Linkedin, etc.

Social Media Posting Times

5) Content Mix – Be sure that 80% of the posts you’re making on social media is curated content that is not yours or about you. 20% of what you share should be your content or marketing posts that are about you.

We believe these are the top five content strategy components that you need to understand and use properly if you expect to be effective with your social media management.

Conversely, here are 3 of the biggest mistakes marketers make with respect to their social media posting (in no particular order):

1) Grouping posts  - This is a failing I see quite often in social media. Sending a ton of posts grouped together right after another with little posts/value before or after is not effective. I see this on Instagram and other platforms as well. Now we are all busy, but this kind of laziness will ultimately have the opposite effect. Meaning people will start to ignore all your posts because of this practice.

2) Retweeting only – There are many people out there that have no content strategy of their own and simply RT or share other people’s posts. Again, this is not a strategy, well it’s not your strategy anyway. It is you executing many other people’s strategies that is not going to establish any thought leadership or results.

3) Not enough – Probably the biggest shortcoming I see is folks just not posting frequently enough. Remember that the social network user is not logged in all day long watching your feed. They login, log off various times all day long. If you are post <20 times per day on Twitter and <5 times per day on Facebook, etc. nobody is seeing anything you are sharing.

4) Over self-promoting – At this point this should be obvious common sense to most, but unfortunately it isn’t. If you are posting more that 15-20% in your feeds about YOU, you either have an ego problem or don’t understand social media marketing yet. Provide selfless, relevant value in your streams and you will earn the right to pitch what you do.

5) Nothing human – People connect with people, not brands and logo’s they’ve never heard of. Be human and approachable. Pretending you are some big company, being sterile and corporate-like in your feeds will not build relationships.

In social media marketing content is where everything starts. If you intend on getting the best results understanding what content drives your audience, the proper quantity and timeliness of that content in your streams and consistency are what get conversations and relationships happening. This is where traffic, revenue and ROI comes from.

What components are you executing with your social media content strategy?

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Filed under Content, Curation, Facebook, Marketing, Relationship, Results, Social Media, Social Media Content, Social Media Management, Social Media Marketing, Social Media ROI, Strategy, Twitter

Four Hashtag Tips That May Surprise You

Hashtag With A Purpose, Not Just Because You Can

Hashtags are one of the most unique aspects of social media. I love that something so unique wasn’t started by a company, but instead the users of a social network got it all going (or so the story goes). Regardless of how it all got started, hashtags have become an integral part of social media marketing and when used properly, they can build community, grow your following and impart salient points within your posts.

Hashtag TipsNow many of us know there are hashtag and social media Nazi’s out there. You know the people who are self-righteous know-it-alls that have an over-confident view and proclamation of the what’s, when’s and how’s of hashtagging properly. I ignore these people and suggest you do as well. Are there more acceptable ways and quantities of hashtagging that can yield better results? Of course. Will the world end if you don’t do them? No.

So to those folks that feel the need to criticize everyone else, we will just say to each their own, smile and move on.

With the housekeeping out-of-the-way, let me bring up a few things you may (or may not) want to consider about your hashtagging tendencies. None the following scenarios are set in stone requirements, but rather suggestions that you should consider.

1) Your company or product name:  This one always blows me away. You have 1200 followers on Twitter, 3000 Facebook Likes and 422 followers on Instagram and your company is only about 2 years old…

   Questions: Why are you hashtagging your company or product name? Do you really think people are searching for your little company hashtag on social media? Do you really think your prospects and/or customers are following the hashtag?

   Answer: Not likely…  At the very most, you are showing everyone what a beginner you are at social media marketing.

   Suggestions: Use hashtags that your prospective customers will actually be searching or following in social media. Your posts are already tagged with your company name and profile, so you are far better off optimizing a proper social media profile and executing a proper social media marketing strategy, than wasting time hashtagging posts with your company name.

2) You’re too serious: Don’t underestimate the use of hashtags through humor. Yes, I mean making up a hashtag that doesn’t exist just to be human and fun. You know, #Icanbeannoying or #Ireallywishyouwouldshutit etc.

These nontraditional uses of hashtags are often overlooked as a way to invoke humor and the approachable into your posts. Don’t over do it, but definitely do it. Have fun with it.

3) Use as many as you want:  Again, there are some that get all Nazi about this, I am not one of them. Frankly, use as many hashtags as you want in a post, just be sure they’re relevant to the content and text you are posting. The worst things you can do are over doing hashtags in a post as well as including tags that are not relevant to the post.

Suggestion: One way to reduce the number of tags you use in a post is to tag keywords within the text of the post itself. If the word you want to hashtag is already in the text of the post, don’t add it as a hashtag too.

Example:  “This is an awesome post about using #hashtags in #socialmedia #marketing effectively”

4) Repetition is the key to advertising, but… : Putting the same hashtag(s) in every single thing you post is not wise.

Suggestion: Be consistent with your hashtagging, but never over do it. If it’s relevant to the content of the post, then hashtag it. If it isn’t a relevant hashtag, don’t.

BONUS Tip - Going across all platforms: Whether you are posting to Twitter, Facebook, Instagram or Google Plus, be sure to hashtag consistently.

Again, these are merely suggestions that should help improve the results you’re getting with hashtags. There is no steadfast rules and I am not one to say what you MUST do, however in my experience these are a few things that you should consider and experiment with and measure the differences between the results. Then adjust and repeat.

Happy Hashtagging!

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Filed under Community, Content, Facebook, Google Plus, Hashtag, Instagram, Marketing, Results, Social Media Marketing, Twitter, Uncategorized

Adjust 3rd Party App Settings In Facebook To Extend Your Personal Reach

If you are like most experienced social media marketing aficionado’s, in addition to business pages, you are also using your personal Facebook profile to build business connections and foster relationships. Again, if you’re experienced in social media marketing, you’re probably using a social media dashboard tools and applications like Hootsuite and Instagram to post some of your updates to that personal Facebook profile.

Facebook Public PostBut did you know that many third part Facebook applications default your posts to friends only? It’s true…

So all that marketing, hashtagging and content posting using Hootsuite, Instagram, and other social media applications is not reaching outside of your designated friend list on Facebook.

I would liken this to the equivalence of having your Twitter account set to private, or at least never showing the bulk of your content to non-followers. This will not extend your reach, grow your connections or make your hashtags effective outside of your existing connections. Tell me how this makes sense for a social media marketing professional? It doesn’t…  People connect with people and do business with people they know and like. But you already know this.

So now that we know most third party applications default to friends only when posting on Facebook, the question remains – How do we adjust third party application settings to default posts to public instead of friends only?

Facebook Hootsuite Settings

Here are the simple steps:

1) click on the gear icon at the top right of the Facebook navigation bar.

2) Click the account settings option.

3) Click “Apps” from the left menu bar.

4) Find the third party applications you’d like to change to public.

5) Click the “visibility” drop down and select “Public” for that application.

You’re done!

From now on, all posts sent from that third party application will be viewable by everyone, dramatically extending your personal social media reach on Facebook beyond your friends and making your personal Facebook social media management more expansive.

*note – We made these setting changes for ourselves in order to increase the reach and effectiveness of our personal marketing efforts using Hootsuite and Bundle Post on Facebook. As we looked through the apps section, we noticed several other applications that also needed changing in the same manner. We suspect you will too.

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Filed under App, Bundle Post, Facebook, Marketing, Social Media, Social Media Management, Social Media Marketing, Twitter

First Ever Social Media Agency Training, Collaboration And Support Group – FREE

As we all know, there are plenty of free and paid solutions out there to learn about social media marketing. There literally thousands of blogs that produce millions of articles on the subject. No matter whether you are a small business wanting to understand how to set up a Facebook page, or an established company interested in expanding your effectiveness on Twitter, there are numerous resources available to you.

Ultimate Social Media GoalBut what if you are a social media agency? What if you are a social media professional considering starting your own social media agency?

Sure, you are excellent at managing social media marketing programs and maintain a steep learning curve of everyday changes that occur in the industry and across the many social networks, but what about the details of your business?

Nobody is writing, educating and supporting this area of the social media marketing industry and everyone is left on their own to guess, make mistakes and try to make it successful. I believe that the social media agency is the single most important segment that needs this support and I have done my best one-on-one with hundreds over the past year and a half to do so, however I am only one man with limited time.

Back in May I got an idea after a coaching call with a startup social media agency and decided to do a quick YouTube video to share my idea and get some feedback. Here’s the video…

The response both in feed and privately was very clear. Tons of people needed and wanted this. So… We created a biweekly Social Media Agency Collaboration Group that delivers the following to its members:

1) Free – Always and forever

2) Goal – The goal of the group is to help all members be more profitable as a company and more effective for clients. We believe it is important that we create a group of agency leaders that are doing exceptional work and making really good money. There is so much business out there and we want to work together to be better at finding and executing it.

3) Support – Social Media Agencies with varying experience supporting one another.

4) Facilitation – Since my company was previously a social media agency, I facilitate the biweekly meetings and offer our experience do’s and don’ts to help the group.

5) Input – Everyone is asked to provide input and feedback on all the topics we discuss, all with a focus of helping each other.

6) Recordings – We record all of our meetings to ensure that those that might miss a meeting or two, or those that join later can always be up to speed with the conversation by listening to previous meetings.

7) Topics – We cover topics from sales, social media management, tools, prospecting, rules to follow, mistakes we’ve made, managing client relationships – just to name a few.

There are no hidden agenda’s or marketing within the group, just people and companies helping each other to improve an industry from the ground up. After only three meetings, over 70 members are involved.

If this industry is going to continue to grow and thrive, we as an industry must make it extremely effective for our clients and very profitable for ourselves. Not doing so could lead to a dot bomb equivalent. You can join the free group on Facebook, which is where we have centralized our communication, sharing of documents and templates as well as links to next meeting webinar, etc. Join Now to get the link to this weeks online meeting!

We would love to get your feedback on what we are doing and ways we can make it more effective. Pop on over to the Facebook group and let’s work together!

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Filed under Agency, Facebook, Fanpage, Marketing, Social Media, Social Media Management, Social Media Marketing, Strategy, Twitter, Uncategorized

Case Study: One Of The Best Things We Did For Our Social Media Program This Year

The social media marketing program at Transparent Language is unusual because we offer language learning software for over 80 languages and our audience is massively segmented. Instead of pushing everyone into a single community, we’ve created over 30 separate community segments, each focused on a specific language. We have developed valuable content streams to share with these communities like:

• A Word of the Day service for 27 languages
• 30 Different language and culture blogs
• 30 Seperate YouTube channels

Testimonial Case StudyThis approach is beneficial to language learners, because they get a focused experience; the shared content, news, and fellow community members are all focused on the same language of interest. It benefits us to be able to target our communications also.

However, managing that many segments is a challenge for a small social media team. We’ve done a good job with our own content, feeding useful items daily to each segment, but one of the rules of good social media is that you don’t always talk about you. We wanted to provide our communities with interesting and relevant curated content about the language they are studying, as well as cultural news and articles about the country where that language is spoken.

In the past, we would take an afternoon, and go through individual Google alerts and other sources, looking for relevant items to post to each community. This was time-consuming and therefore we were unable to do it consistently. I could only get to the top half-dozen segments of our community due to the time required. It was from doing this exercise manually that I was able to instantly recognize the value of what Bundle Post had to offer when they showed me the demo.

We implemented Bundle Post in February 2013. Here is what the typical results look like for user reach on our Facebook pages:

bundle post social media results

It’s worth mentioning that the reach prior to our Bundle Post case study was quite respectable; we had a good content strategy in place, however Bundle Post substantially changed our game in the following ways:

  • We can now efficiently recycle our evergreen content back to our channels for an encore.
  • We are able to pull in additional streams of our own content (vocabulary lists posted by our Byki List Central community) and incorporate those into our content stream; we hadn’t been able to do this efficiently in the past
  • Instead of hunting through Google Alerts manually and scheduling a couple days of content sporadically, we now quickly identify quality content items for ALL of our communities, and consistently schedule out a week’s worth of content in one session – for ALL segments
  • In addition to feeds, Bundle Post lets us create a collection of our best marketing content, web pages and resources to remind our community about

All of this begs the question, is the higher engagement beneficial? Our communities continue to grow by thousands every month, so obviously higher visibility helps with that, but I wanted to look a little deeper than the raw follower counts. Like, say, web traffic.

We’ve seen a 65% increase in traffic to our website from Facebook since we started using Bundle Post. Even more impressive is the 263% increase in traffic results coming from Twitter.

Content posted to Twitter has a much shorter lifecycle than Facebook content. Our 1 – 2 content posts/day were fairly effective for the relatively slower-moving Facebook content stream, but Twitter gobbled those up much faster and it just wasn’t enough. Bundle Post allowed us to step up the Twitter volume in a way we just couldn’t do manually, and the fact that it lets us create separate schedule templates for the different frequency needs of these two platforms clearly pays off.

The Bottom line:

Signing up for Bundle Post was one of the best things we did for our social media program this year. So many social media strategies and tools are hard to attribute tangible results to, but this one has been a clear and dramatic benefit to our program.

This was an unsolicited case study and guest post by:

LG-1Lorien Green @LorienGreen
Lorien is the Inbound Marketing Manager for Transparent Language, Inc., a language software company with a combined social following of over three million. In her spare time, she makes indie documentaries and obsesses about the pinball resurgence.

*If Bundle Post can impact the results of a business that has such a highly complex and fragmented target audience, imagine what it can do for your market. Get your free trial now.

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Filed under Bundle Post, Community, Content, Curation, Fanpage, Marketing, Results, Social content management, Social Media, Social Media Content, Social Media Management, Social Media Marketing, Strategy, Twitter, Uncategorized

Creating A Social Media Drip Marketing Campaign – How We Launched 2.0

Social media marketing campaigns should be common place within your overall social media marketing strategy. A campaign is something outside of your normal efforts and strategy that is specific to an event, launch or other unique marketing goal. Incorporating social media campaigns into your social media marketing efforts are an exceptional way to leverage your existing strategy and community for a clearly defined short-term objective, while maintaining your existing strategy and community expectations.

Social Media Drip CampaignOne example of a social media marketing campaign was the launch of our all new Bundle Post website, user interface and 2.0 system that went live on July 2013. Our entire launch campaign strategy was executed within social media, without using any ads or other means. The campaign created incredible buzz about our platform and ultimately doubled our active user base in less than 60 days. No small results…

So how did we do it?

There were several steps and planning involved in our social media drip marketing campaign that began months ahead of time. Meaning we had already done the work to build a community by delivering value in our streams and the effort to establish and maintain relationships with that community. Had we not first done this, nothing else in the campaign would have achieved such incredible results. Before you plan a campaign, ensure that you have invested the time and effort with your followers and friends. Nothing is more crucial in your social media marketing efforts before you embark on additional campaigns.

As with any effective marketing, time spent planning and preparing will be in direct proportion to the results you obtain. Below we will outline exactly what we did to plan, create and execute our 2.0 launch campaign using Bundle Post and how you can do the same.

Creating A Social Media Marketing Drip Campaign Using Bundle Post:

Step 1: Clearly Define Campaign – Be sure you have defined your objective and the length of the campaign very clearly. Know exactly when you the campaign is to start and end, as well as the goal you are trying to achieve. It is incredibly important that the goals and objectives you set for a campaign is realistic. Not doing so will surely make the campaign unsuccessful and more importantly jeopardize your decisions when creating your campaign based on such false hopes.

Here are the launch campaign details we used: 

  • Objective – Create buzz and awareness of the Bundle Post software for those who had not heard about it, and let those that have heard about it know that a big new release was coming.
  • Goal – Increase active user base by 30% during the launch campaign.
  • Campaign Timeline – 2 weeks (exactly 13 days) prior to the scheduled launch date.

Step 2: Create A List of Supporters – You will want to create a list of people, brands and contacts that are your supporters that will, (without question) be willing to help you with your campaign. You must be sure that you ONLY ask your real friends and supporters to be involved. Don’t include big name social media people, large brands and celebrities that you WISH would be a supporter and help with your campaign, just include customers and relationships you know will be willing to help.

*More on supporters in steps 3 and 7.

Step 3: Create Schedules – This step is the most complicated, so take it slow and make sure you cover all angles.

First, determine the number of posts per day you want to send for all of your related social media accounts and networks. Do not forget your personal accounts if you are a brand.

Here are the schedules we used: 

  • Campaign Twitter (@fondalo) - 4 x’s per day
  • Campaign Twitter (@BundlePost) - 4 x’s per day
  • Campaign Twitter (@PerfectJulia) - 4 x’s per day
  • Campaign Linkedin - 2 times per day
  • Campaign Bundle Post Fanpage - 1 time per day
  • Campaign Personal Facebook - 3 times per day
  • Campaign G+ Page – 2 times per day
  • Campaign Other People – More on this in later steps

Within Bundle Post Schedules, you will want to make a new schedule for each of the social media accounts that will be involved in the campaign. If there are multiple social media accounts on the same network that have the same number of posts per day (Twitter in our example) make separate schedules for each with the time slots different for each. This way they will not be posting at the same time on the same network, though they will be posting 4 times each day during the campaign.

*you can also use the Bundle Post drip campaign for FB pages, Facebook personal profiles, Linkedin and G+ pages and any other groups or social networks supported by Hootsuite.

Step 4: Write Your Posts – This step should be broken into to segments:

  • Number of Posts: Before you begin writing the social media posts for your campaign, you first need to determine how many posts you need for the entire campaign. To calculate this, take the highest number of posts per day in any of the schedules you have made for your campaign (in our example it is 4 posts per day for Twitter) and multiply it by the number of days for the campaign. In our example, we did a 13 day campaign.

4 posts per day x 13 = 52 total posts needed

  • Writing Posts: So now you will want to create a new “My Content” folder in Bundle Post and begin writing the text of your 52 posts and include a URL where appropriate for each post. It is really important that these 52 posts have no duplicates for two reasons; 1) Bundle Post will not allow you to have duplicate posts included in an export (due to Hootsuite’s restriction) and 2) You want all of your posts to be different so they are not intrusive in your streams. Using a small number of URLs mixed across the 52 posts is fine though.

Here are some examples we used: 

  • The All new @BundlePost 2.0 will be launching June 13th!!
  • The brand new Bundle Post 2.0 will have an entirely new website and improved user interface. Are you ready? http://BundlePost.com
  • Get your Free @BundlePost account before they’re gone June 13th! http://BundlePost.com

*Notice that some posts had URLs and some did not. You’ll want to mix it up depending on your specific campaign requirements, product or service.

Step 5: Create Facebook Graphics – We added some creativity to our campaign by creating graphics about the launch that counted down the days like a space shuttle launch. We manually uploaded and scheduled them on our Facebook page and as they posted live each day, we would manually share links to the graphics on all the other social networks.

We highly suggest this for many cases. It not only provides the visual aspect for your messaging, it helps drive traffic and likes on the fanpage, making the graphics you post on the Facebook page linkable from other networks.

Step 6: Do Your Bundle Post Exports –  Once your posts are written, you will need to do your Bundle Post Exports for each schedule you created in the system. This will need to be done no later than the day before the campaign will need to start posting. This step has the following sequence:

  1. Click Export in Bundle Post.
  2. Select the schedule you want to use and the date that the first post for the campaign should start. (in our example the start date was 13 days before launch)
  3. On the Export Table, scroll down to My Content folders and open the “Campaign” folder with your 52 posts in it.
  4. Select all the posts for the export, run hashtags if desired, then export.
  5. Upload the Bundle Post file into Hootsuite, selecting the proper social media account that coincides with the schedule you just used.

*Important Notes:

  • If you have multiple accounts on the same social network (as in our case on Twitter) not only did we use different posting times for each, we also used the Auto Sort function on the Export Table to ensure that the same posts were not posted to the same network by these three Twitter accounts at or near the same time slots.
  • To do the exports for the other social networks, you will also calculate the number of posts you need for them based on the number of posts per day. For Example: In our campaign we posted 4x’s per day on Twitter and only 2x’s per day on Linkedin. Therefore we exported 52 posts for the Twitter campaign from the My Content folder and only 26 posts for the Linkedin schedule export. – *If we exported all 52 posts for the Linkedin schedule, the campaign would run for 26 days on Linkedin, due to the fewer posts per day in the Bundle Post schedule made for our Linkedin account. Make sense?

Step 7: Do Exports For Supporters – Lastly we used a little known ability of Bundle Post to expand the reach and success of our campaign. We created additional schedules and exports for that list of friends and supports and gave them Bundle Post files to upload into their Hootsuite accounts! Therefore we had some 20 other Twitter accounts also sharing our campaign posts at different times and all they had to do was upload our file. Easy and effective.

So there you have it. All the details of how we launched 2.0 using the Bundle Post system to create an effective social media drip campaign. The result of the campaign not only achieved our objectives, it exceeded our goal by a huge percentage. We increased our active user base by 100% instead of the 30% goal and have continued the growth with a smaller, ongoing drip campaign using Bundle Post that continues to drive traffic and new user growth.

How are you going to use Bundle Post drip campaigns for you and your clients?  Get started FREE

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Filed under Bundle Post, Community, Facebook, Fanpage, Followers, Google Plus, Hootsuite, Marketing, Results, Social content management, Social Media, Social Media Management, Social Media Marketing, Twitter, Uncategorized