Should I Comment Before or After The RT Text Of A Post?

I am asked frequently how you are supposed to handle ReTweets, Replies or Reply All on Twitter.  Do you comment before or after the post? Should you comment at the beginning of a RT or at the end? What about when replying all?

Let me start off by saying that there is no RIGHT or WRONG way here. There is no required standard or specific accepted etiquette to follow.  My goal here is to share what I do and the reasons why. Most will be preference or visually motivated. Let’s get started.

ReTweet:

Whenever I RT a post on Twitter, I always put my comments at the beginning of the post. It’s my humble opinion that since I am RT’ing someone’s post and thereby will appear in their mentions, it should be easy for them to tell I am commenting. Additionally, I want my followers to see my comments in the post first, so it is clear I think it is a good article or information.

Reply:

When I @ mention/reply to a single person I typically enter my comments AFTER their name in the post.  This seems to get their attention easily and highlight to my other followers the person I am speaking with in a good way.

Reply All: 

Just as with the Reply function, I typically enter my comments at the end of the list of people I am mentioning in the post.  As a HootSuite user, it automatically places my cursor in this location, making it quick and easy to do so.

I hope these little tips are helpful for you and clarify some ways to use Replies and ReTweets more effectively.

22 Comments

Filed under Hootsuite, Retweet, Social Media, Social Media Content, Social Media Management, Social Media Marketing, Twitter

22 responses to “Should I Comment Before or After The RT Text Of A Post?

  1. Kudos! Thank you for explaining. This is why I like to refer your blog…..because you explain the little things in social media that make a huge difference to the newbie. Explain it in such a way it is simply easy to understand.

    Thank you for your time.

    ~Julia Hull

  2. If I am going to comment I always do it before the retweet so I van mention it if I retweet. I don’t always comment, but if I don’t then I comment on the retweet instead.

  3. When you retweet do you copy and paste into a new tweet? I don’t have an option to add a comment when I click retweet.

    • Reese,

      Approximately 75% of the activity done on Twitter is done using third party applications. Most of them still use the old RT method that allows commenting and editing a RT. An example is HoutSuite.

      Robert

  4. Thanks @Robert, I’m currently using Twitter, basically because I can’t decide which 3rd party app I want to use.

  5. Pingback: Should I Comment Before or After The RT Text Of A Post? (via bundlepost) « Jeff in Seattle

  6. At last..that clears things up… Thanx!! ;-) (I am MT this page!)

  7. Robert,
    Commenting before the RT is a good idea, specifically if you take part in chats where there are a lot of RTs and comments going on. It ensures a smooth interaction and that anyone who wants to RT the comment can do it quickly and easily. I’ve done both, but I think I’ll adopt commenting before the RT as a rule of thumb.

    Joel

  8. Thanks for the great advice! One comment on your comment: I just started with HootSuite but my only frustration with it is that it doesn’t give me the option to “Quote Tweet,” only to Retweet. Your comment seems to imply one *can* “Quote Tweet” on HootSuite. Am I missing something?

  9. Good stuff to ponder…agree there is no right or wrong way. (I also like that I found a “YourADChoices” ad on your site. This program was developed by my company, the IAB, in association with A’s, AAF, ANA, BBB, DMA, and NAI…how’s that for a list of initials!!)

  10. Good to know that there is now right or wrong answer and I have been doing it right per this post. I have wondered and now I don’t. Thx. Elizabeth

  11. Pingback: Should I Comment Before or After The RT Text Of A Post? | Data Nerd's Corner | Scoop.it

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