Why My Klout Score Will Not Likely Exceed 75

In my investigation of Klout and it’s scoring algorithm, as well as watching videos of Megan Berry, Klout’s Marketing Manager, explain the technology, I believe my Klout score is likely to remain where it is. I have seen the improvements with their systems and how they affect my score, combined with how my sustained and consistent activity creates an impact as well.

There are many factors that go into their scoring algorithm that in my opinion provides the best measurement of someone’s social influence on various topics. Think Google’s search algorithm and the complexities that it addresses and carry that over to the social media space and I think you will get the idea of the variables involved. It is highly complex and is taking a lot into consideration, then uses that data collection to establish a baseline for a scoring matrix.

My investigation has determined that at some level the amount of engagement you receive from those with higher Klout scores than you is a significant factor in your score improvement over time. Since I am one that does not follow celebrities, nor do I engage with industry “guru’s or #fauxperts“, this will peg my score at a consistent level based on the activity I am currently doing. I am also perfectly comfortable with my level of activity, engagement and the results we achieve based on those levels.

I for one have never changed what I do for my social media marketing in order to influence my score. Most of the people I know personally that have higher scores are also those realizing ROI and effective social media campaigns. I will share with you some of what I do as a part of my social media management that makes me effective, resulting in the success and Klout score I have.

Content is king:

Everything in social media starts with content. Sharing valuable, relevant content for your target audience is THE most important thing. You must be consistent at this practice, maintaining a constant stream of value. Additionally, you need to post about YOU, what you are doing and add the human element into your presence.  Valuable content breeds conversation, which results in relationship.

Related to effectiveness, your content must create engagement. Likes, comments, Retweets and sharing is what you are looking for and is a significant part of what Klout measures. Make people laugh, post things that spark action and involvement. This is the social part of social media. Oddly enough it is also the social part of the real world as well. It’s how we typically get to know people when we first meet them.

I am very comfortable knowing that my consistent, relevant content coupled with my engaging and helpful spirit will keep my Klout score roughly where it is today. I hope this post helps you to increase your effective social media marketing that produces financial gains and a Klout score that reflects that hard work!

18 Comments

Filed under Klout, Social content management, Social Media, Social Media Content, Social Media Management, Social Media Marketing, Social Media ROI

18 responses to “Why My Klout Score Will Not Likely Exceed 75

  1. You nailed it Robert!

    ~Jim

  2. Out of curiousity Robert, how do you think the whole +K thing will effect scoring or do you think, as I do, that it’s a great way to show someone who influences you that you appreciate their support, content, etc?

    • I think you are correct. I doubt a few +K’s will do much of anything to your score, however I have suspect that the Klout score and frequency of said +K’s may have an affect long term. I also think that higher volume of +K’s on a specific topic will adjust the topics shown that you are influential about. I am realizing this currently as my main topic “Social Media” has moved to number 3 or 4 on my influential topic list, yet it is what I always talk about. This has to be due to +K influence…

      Just one guys guess…

      Robert

  3. Mr. Caruso,
    This was a greatly entertaining post. When I signed onto Klout, I had originally found the site, and its scoring system, a bit arbitrary. You are luckier than I in that you were actually able to see the method behind the madness of scoring and the whole design of Klout. However, I still find it a bit arbitrary; Twitter friends of mine, in fact, have a steady stream of celebrity-related tweets and about random, mindless information. I guess, as you said, it DOES all relate to content. It doesn’t necessarily matter what the content is, be it fitness, celebrity gossip, or #socialmedia, as long as your followers are engaged, entertained and responsive. If it’s related to your following, you can and will be influential. I actually gave a similar speech to my classmates at Marist College this April about the importance of content (in terms of relevance AND consistency). Glad to see your input as similar!

  4. I think this is all right. I also can’t help but think that beyond something like 75 or even 65, you need to be doing something else, out there in the world, that is drawing people to you. I feel like if you’re in the 70s you’ve hit minor celebrity level, and there’s not going to be many people who get there just tweeting.

  5. Robert, I will give you a hearty +1 regarding you providing “consistent, relevant content coupled with engaging and helpful spirit”! I’ve enjoyed our interaction just over the last few months, and I find myself wishing I could get a biz trip to Portland to hang with more of my Pacific NW gang. Since I adore my family, I also enjoy your updates regarding your treasured moments with your family.

    A well-earned Klout=75, my friend!

  6. Sarah Manley

    Robert,
    Great post and I agree with your content, I think you can get to a certain point where you can “top out”. But I do think trying to increase your score, by following a few simple things that I posted in my blog this week about Klout is something that people should do, if they want to be a social media influence within their industry. http://www.vimm.com/5-ways-to-power-up-your-klout-score/

  7. Jim

    You are 100 in my book!

  8. I was talking to someone the other day and she said ‘you have a higher Klout score than anyone in our company’ and I have to admit I was a little excited by the slight tone of jealousy. I didnt do anything special or go out of my way to ‘work’ on my Klout score. In fact, until she said that, I had not really even looked at it or monitored its progress or decline since Klout first appeared on the scene. I simply reply where appropriate, share stuff I create, share stuff I love that others have created, post interested news articles and unbelievably funny videos and will occasionally talk about what I had for lunch or complain about my dreadfully slow computer. No magic to it except be yourself!

  9. Robert,

    To some extent I have to agree with you as well. Although I’m not quite sure why you wouldn’t want to associate yourself with others that have a higher Klout score. Their influence is high for a reasons therefore it will help improve yours. Although i’m sure you have your reasons for who you follow just like anyone else. Content Is King – same applies for SEO although lately I’ve been hearing things that now it’s bundled into your “social media strategy” or rather “social media campaign” activities. For example I’ve seen my Klout score jump by not following any celebrities or people with high score. I’m not quite sure of the algorithm involved here just stating facts from my own experience.

    Thanks for sharing!
    Ivan Temelkov
    http://www.ivantemelkov.com

    • Ivan,

      I don’t ignore followers with higher Klout scores, I just have never been interested in Celebrities, Hollywood types and especially “Experts” in Social Media. I have steered clear of the later in order to formulate my own methods, thoughts and content, without any influence that would impact my suggestions or actions. Make sense?

      Thanx for the comments!

      Robert

  10. I was also wondering how the algorithm works…

    really cool info, thanks.

    Olmo

  11. Great piece – informative, easy to read and fun. I too however, want to know how the algorithm works. I’m wondering if Klout is only able to determine topics when tags are used? I have a personal profile as well as a professional profile and so far, the personal profile (because it is based solely on FB interaction) seems only to offer ratings based on # of interactions – but has not yet been able to determine most-discussed topics. I’ve not been a large user of tags on my professional side either and because of that, I only have one topic listed – which is not accurate in the least. Soooo… how do they determine what we’re discussing/what we’re most influential about? http://klout.com/#/PRiSMBrand

    • They do not release details of their alg or inevitably people would quickly start gaming it. Just be real, engage and let time (which is where all algs work best) do what it needs to do and slowly your topics and activity will be shown…

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s