Category Archives: Facebook

When Brands Fail To Remain Relevant, They RadioShack – Who’s Next?

Now that the buzz and media frenzy about the demise of RadioShack and the analysis of why by Wall Street and other experts  is beginning to subside, another consideration should be examined. What happens to brands that do not remain relevant, stop innovating and sit on their hind quarters? Well in short, they RadioShack…

When Brands Fail to Remain RelevantAre You Relevant?

On and offline businesses should be getting a clear message that remaining relevant through evolving with changing times is a must. The penalties for not doing so can be incredibly harsh as we have seen with many top brands in North America that became so massive and full bureaucracy that they could no longer move or even make decisions quickly when times changed. A reliance on their “brand” coupled with an expectation that their customers would remain loyal if they continued to do business and usual has resulted in many going the way of RadioShack.

Many have commented and speculated as to the reasons for RadioShack and other big brands falling, but the details all tend to simply boil down to not remaining relevant and changing with the times. We’ve seen very similar results with the likes of Palm, BlackBerry and even Kmart. Regardless of the industry, company size or product niche, brands and marketers must realize what their customers want, how their buying habits change and how marketing and delivery of products and services continually change.

Who’s Next?

We believe the next industry that we can expect to experience a significant shake up is in the content world. Now we bet you are thinking we mean online, and that will be part of it, but for this discussion we are referring to content providers, television and Hollywood.

Just like digital disrupted the music industry with the rise of the iPod and later online music services like Pandora and iHeartRadio, the cable and satellite space is going to be in real trouble. Visual content we normally think of for television, movie theaters and DVD players has been on a long transition toward streaming services via the likes of Netflix and others.

Now before you start thinking “duh, we know this”, it’s important that we take the discussion to a deeper level. Beyond the innovation of technology resulting in an advancement in relevance that Streaming Video providers are delivering to the market, there are a few other things that they are taking advantage of that might not be as obvious.

1) People hate their Cable Company – Maybe hate is too strong of a word, but most of us dislike Comcast and the like. We feel you have extorted from us for years, displayed horrible customer service and near zero concern for us as a customer. Your social media has highlighted these facts to many and your prices are not sustainable. Most of use want something better, that gives us control, without the $200+ monthly bill.

2) Content is becoming a Commodity – With the internet expanding in technology and access on a daily basis, we know how to get the content we want, without being tied to our television. Though we like our local content and special “shows”, we are tired of you controlling the content we have access to and when and how we can access it. Additionally, your technology is seemingly ancient and we want the latest, easiest to use and non-tethered options that fit our lifestyle.

3) On Demand Rules Consumption – The way we want to consume content is changing. We have increasingly busy and diverse work hours and responsibilities for career and home. We want access to content when it is convenient for us, not you.

These are just a few of the reasons that Comcast and the like are going to see a disruption in their monopoly businesses. Technology is advancing and driving down price, while increasing access, mobility and on demand capabilities today’s consumer wants. Innovation, service and care has all but disappeared in the space, while prices and restrictions continue to rise. Consumers are screaming for alternatives and the industry is only clamping down harder to retain their domination. This opens the door for massive market disruption.

Online Disruption As Well?

These similar constraints and concerns will ultimately disrupt online content consumption patterns as well. As consumers increasingly tire of Google and Facebook controlling the content they’re able to see and easily discover and marketer frustration is amplified for many connected reasons, a shakeup to the status quo is certainly going to come in short order. Consumers want the most recent relevant content in increasingly simplified ways and content marketers, brands and blogs need improved abilities to get in front of those consumers with their content. Do you see the similarities here? Another space rife for disruption.

How do you see relevance and innovation disrupting on and offline brands, marketers and consumers in the future?

 

 

8 Comments

Filed under Brand, Content, customer service, Facebook, Google, marketers, Marketing, Social Media

What 1 Billion Mobile Users On Facebook Looks Like [infographic]

At least once every month, more than 1 billion Facebook users will access the behemoth social site in 2015. There is no doubt that as consumers become even more mobile with their internet usage, Facebook will take advantage of it with mobile ad revenues that are expected to be three-quarters of their total ad income. As mobile app users have made the switch to a predominant mobile/social connection and Facebook has facilitated their business model and functionality to adjust to this, 1 billion can seem to be a small number.

Mobile internet usage, social networking access as well as social media marketing in the mobile age is changing how we do a lot of things today. In some sense it has increased our patience in normal life, since waiting on someone who is late doesn’t involve boredom and staring at the ceiling, while at the same time we expect instant gratification, responses and communication with our friends, favorite brands and vendors. But if we really considered the billion number, it may cause us to reconsider how we currently look at mobile and how it will continue to evolve.

With numbers so large being tossed around in business, banking and social media, we sometimes don’t grasp how big that number actually is. In order to truly grasp just how enormous 1 billion is, and understand the incredible impact 1 billion mobile users have on a social network, we decided to do some research on the 1 billion figure and put it into more interesting perspectives that might surprise you.

Infographic - 1 Billion Mobile Facebook Users

Before we go any further, we’d like to add that by 2016, over 2.16 billion smartphone users will exist worldwide. Coupled with what we already explained about what 1 billion looks like, it’s important to recognize how quickly these numbers scale when they are that large.

Once you are able to conceptualize the size and scale of 1 billion and relate it to the number of mobile users that are accessing Facebook, you can truly get a picture of the impact mobile is having on social networking, social media marketing and mobile advertising.

If you also consider that there is only an estimated 1.9 Billion smartphone users in the entire world, the total of 1 billion mobile Facebook users begins to appear as large as it really is.

What is your strategy to leverage the 1 billion mobile Facebook app users over the next decade?

Leave a comment

Filed under ad, advertising, App, Facebook, Marketing, Mobile, Smart Phone, Social Media, Social Media Marketing

Top 2015 Social Media Predictions – Disruptive Technologies

It’s that time of year again when many social media “professionals” publish their predictions for the coming new year. Rarely, but on occasion, there are less than general forecasts that hit the bullseye. More often than not, many of the predicted transformations, Social Media & Digital Marketing Predictions for 2015platform trajectories and overall suggested industry paths are more or less off base or plainly obvious already from the previous year.

Although we don’t profess to be any more effective with a crystal ball, we believe we do have a fairly good pulse on the industry and have made some pretty on target predictions in the past. Though this is going to be one of our more lengthy posts, as we attempt to detail the background behind these predictions and outline where we see things going, it will be worth the read.

What we believe is very different about this coming year is due to social media in general, as well as the main platforms have matured in significant ways over the last several years, making their current paths pretty obvious to many. Furthermore the consolidation of platforms like Instagram and WhatsApp, among many others have further shown an industry that has grown up.

So What’s Next?

It is our belief that 2015 will see the rise of some very disruptive technology in the social, content marketing and search spaces. These required digital marketing components have become more and more disjointed and the gap in the playing field between the massive content sites and the small brand or blogger is widening at an alarming pace.

Why Is A Change Coming?

When an industry matures, what often happens next is consolidation. The acquisition of perceived current and/or future competition. We have seen this hold true in nearly every industry on and offline. Growth becomes more difficult as an industry matures and market penetration reaches critical mass, requiring acquisition to enable continued growth into new and adjoining markets.

Let’s face the facts, the common thread across all digital marketing is CONTENT. In 2013-2014 Facebook taught us that content is not only key to social and digital marketing success, but more importantly we have to find better ways to utilize it and control it if we are going to be successful – OR – you are going to have to pay to get people to see your content online.

Most of us now know that you must be consistently creating great content and getting traffic to that content in order to make it effective, however Mashable, Huffington Post and the numerous other massive content sites are dominating the noise, shares and traffic online. Everyone from large to local brands, as well as marketers and solepreneurs are now creating content, but are also competing with the plethora of content, news and celebrity sites where there is just no level playing field has become a big problem today and is only expected to get worse.

Today’s Options:

Given the current state of social media and content marketing, you are left with four main options to get traffic to your content.

1) Huge Community – You already have a huge loyal social community built (Big Brands). This represents only about 1% or less of social media accounts.

2) Sharing Platforms (Triberr) – I’ll share yours if you share mine, but wait, you’re not sharing mine. Even when you do share mine, few in your social community care what you share and I don’t get much or any traffic. Are you sure you’re really influential?

3) Social Pay to Play – If you want traffic to your content on Facebook, you better start paying. Does it work, sure! Is it sustainable or cost-effective? We don’t believe it is.

4) SEO/PPC – So you’re spending time on SEO for your content in hopes that it drives traffic. The only problem is that Google only wants to show searchers the most popular PAGES for their search, not the most resent/relevant content for their search. Why? Because they want you to invest in Pay Per Click ads on their platform. This isn’t a real solution for long-term, sustainable content traffic. Is it an option for traffic to your home page or landing page still, maybe…

General Predictions For 2015:

Now that social media and digital marketing has reached this mature phase, we can comfortably predict the next phase, which is disruption. Mature markets with massive companies dominating their space will always give rise to new innovation by smaller, lesser known businesses. We saw this with Google years ago, as they rapidly displaced the previous dominating search engines of AOL, Yahoo, Lycos and Alta Vista. (Ok, we just aged ourselves)

In 2015 we believe we are going to see technologies that will disrupt the status quo of the combination of social media marketing, content marketing and SEO/PPC marketing. These disconnected marketing components are ripe for new and innovative technology that will deliver unique and disruptive capabilities in 2015. We believe technology that uncovers new and completely unique ways to drive traffic to content, provide paths to improved social ROI and diminish the SEO/PPC models we have seen over the past decade are going to be made clear very soon.

Disruption Areas To Watch In 2015:

There are several key areas that I think are going to be dramatically effected with disruption in 2015:

1) General Social Media Marketing – As social media marketing becomes more and more complex, new technology is required to make it easier, regardless of user experience, knowledge or skill. This is a requirement for the industry whose time has come.

2) Big Data – The internal, open web and social silo’s are disconnected and therefore not as useful as they could be. Solutions that connect open web content to traffic to social will change this for big and small brands.

3) Traffic To Content – Technology that levels the playing field for content creators, exposes their content to those that need it and expanding the social reach of content in new innovative ways will be realized.

4) SEO/PPC – Though never going away, Google has made it clear that the inevitable demise of SEO is a top priority. Using SEO and PPC for content traffic will become less useful, requiring innovative technology to replace it.

5) CrowdCuration – We believe we will see the rise of new technology called crowdcuration that will make curating and sharing unique content very efficient, while enabling social users to build new traffic, thought leadership and communities through this new platform.

We will be writing a lot more on these 5 areas over the next 6 months, so be sure to subscribe to our blog, or add our feed to your BundlePost account.

 

11 Comments

Filed under automation, BundlePost, Content, content creation, Curation, Facebook, Marketing, Results, SEO, Social content management, Social Media, Social Media Content, Social Media Management, Social Media Marketing, social media tool

How To Create Reusable Marketing Message Campaigns To Drive Website Traffic

Would you like to learn how to schedule social media posts about YOUR website in Bulk? If you don’t share things about you, who will? Lately, I’ve been doing what seems to be fishing expeditions online, trying to figure out more about folks. Appears to be we have one extreme where people share all about themselves only and the other extreme where they share nothing at all. Why would someone not share about themselves on social media? Especially in regards to their business and what they do.

Yes, this is yet another blog about self-promotion! Bare with me as I share with you a tool, our very own BundlePost to help you schedule your social media posts for your website, or otherwise your marketing messages and content! What we refer to as our “My Content” section in BundlePost.  This BundlePost feature enables social media agencies to store efficiently and schedule marketing content for their clients and themselves.

Let me simplify all that for you – It’s not just for social media agencies. If you have a website that you need to share on social platforms, then BundlePost is the perfect tool to allow you to schedule posts, efficiently, strategically and in bulk.

There’s no question whether you should or shouldn’t self-promote. It’s a must! According to GlobalWebIndex “A quarter of internet users say that social network-based retail stores make them more likely to purchase online. Globally, 7 in 10 active Facebook users say they have bought a product online in the past month, with the equivalent figure among Twitter’s active user base climbing to approach the three-quarter mark.”

Without getting into the great detail of why, what or when to promote yourself. I thought I would instead get into the ‘How’ to support yourself. By using a friends website as an example.

Step by Step on how to schedule YOUR Marketing Message Content

1. Add our Google Chrome Extension – please add to your browser if you haven’t already. Here is the link – Bundlet

2. Set up a campaign schedule in BundlePost – for example, I have set one up for my friend on Twitter and LinkedIn for now. Selecting three specific times for posting her content to Twitter and two specific times for LinkedIn

JeanneSchedule

3. Using The Bundlet – Now the fun begins!
Open up a new tab in your browser and go to your website
Click on the Bundlet extension in your Chrome browser.
Next to the ‘Save Content to’ click on the drop down and scroll to the bottom where it has the “My Content” and add a new folder.
In the text box, you will see a brief description of the web page that you are on.
Highlight and replace what is there with something you want to say about this web page when posting on social media.

Jeanne

The brief description that appeared in the Bundlet for this web page was –  “Caribbean Cruises from HEARTS ON THE GO TRAVEL – a division of Cordially Yours Travel.” I replaced it with something that might make more sense for Jeanne’s audience on Twitter, Facebook or LinkedIn, like “Did you know that you can make payments on your next vacation through us? Ready to thaw out in the Caribbean?”

4. SUBMIT to save that post in your new My Content folder inside BundlePost. (before closing the Bundlet and moving to step 5, we suggest writing and keeping multiple posts for the same URL/page with different creative text)

5. Repeat Process – Go to another web page on your same website and repeat the process.
As you can see, my friend Jeanne has a ton of fun content on her website. I could be here at my laptop all week long adding things to her My Content Travel Website folder. I can also set up several different folders for her if I wanted to.

6. Start Export – After you have your folder full of 40 or more posts, click on the ‘Start Export’ button. Inside your BundlePost account in the navigation header and select which schedule you would like to use. Then pick the day in which you want to start scheduling posts for this campaign and click ‘Continue.’

7. Export Table -Congratulations you are now on the export table!
On the second level, light blue navigation bar click on the My Content Button drop-down and select the content folder you created in the earlier steps. EXAMPLE: Jeanne’s Travel website. Next, click on “Select all” followed by the “Move Selected” button.

You should see a screen that looks similar to the image below, with all of your tweets, scheduled and formatted for you! You don’t have to deal with spreadsheets anymore.

JeanneExport

8. Hashtags – I hashtagged things as I created otherwise we would have used our hashtag folder at this point. Another amazing feature in BundlePost

9. Drag and Drop – You can move things around by dragging or dropping the different posts or click on the randomize buttons to mix up the order of the scheduled posts as desired.

10. Edit – Glance over everything and if you need to edit just double click on the text of a particular post, make changes and click off to save it.

11. Download – We are almost done!!
Now you want to select the dashboard you use by clicking on their icon on the top of this export page.
Jeanne is a big Hootsuite fan, so I clicked on the Hootsuite logo to download the formatted and scheduled posts for the multi-day promotional campaign.
(note – never open the download file, simply save it where you want it on your computer)

12. Upload – Inside your Hootsuite Pro account you will find a Bulk message uploader link under scheduling in your compose message area.
A pop-up will then ask you for the CSV file you would like to use. Locate the file you downloaded from BundlePost and then select the second date format.
Select the proper social profile.
Submit!

13. You have successfully scheduled – 40 (or up to 100) new messages! Since this was sent to Jeanne’s Twitter account, that means for the next 13 days she will have her marketing messages going out on Twitter without having to do anything else. Just think if we created more? The 40 posts  that I created for Jeanne will remain in her BundlePost account, so she has the ability to schedule them out again and again if she would like. What’s more, she also has the ability to modify them at anytime by editing them.

Once you have input your marketing message posts into your BundlePost My Content folders, you are not only saving a ton of time, but can be extremely consistent in your promotional sharing. You will drive traffic to your website on a daily basis, with limited effort.

“My Content” is an important part of effective social media marketing and an incredible feature of BundlePost.

It is important to note that you should share about yourself, what you do and your marketing message content. Using BundlePost My Content folders is one way to ensure that we always have something going in our feeds about us. Just one of many features we have to help you save time.

If you currently do not have a BundlePost account and would like assistance in setting up your account please let us know. If you have been with BundlePost for awhile now and would like additional training in how to get the most out of it, we are here to help.

 

PerfectJuliaBy Julia Hull @PerfectJulia

Director of Customer Support at BundlePost

Social media marketing professional that joined the BundlePost team early in its transition from a social media agency to a software company. She is an expert in social media tools.

Leave a comment

Filed under Agency, Brand, BundlePost, Bundlet, Content, Curation, Facebook, Hashtag, Hootsuite, Marketing, Social Media, social media automation, Social Media Content, Social Media Marketing, social media tool, Twitter

Why Ello and Tsu Entered The Social Media Scene and Why They’re Doomed

There are so many strong beliefs, perspectives and views within the social media industry, and therefore this post is going to be more controversial than we normally publish. The different “camps” of social media enthusiasts, professionals and celebrities are almost as Why Ello and Tsu came about and why they're doomedpolarized as the political parties within the United States and that means emotions can run rampant. Nevertheless, I am known for saying what needs to be said and I will attempt to do that without the emotionally charged words that often spark heated words.

There are several key reasons why new social networks like Ello and Tsu appear on the social networking scene with frequency. Having an understanding of these reasons is essential to make informed decisions on whether to chase after these numerous shiny new and incredibly distracting sites.

A Few Reasons Why Sites Like Ello and Tsu Appear

Trust – Facebook has a long history of building mistrust with its users and business customers. Constant changes, privacy issues and a lack of care or concern for their users. In recent years, Twitter has begun to make users and app developers weary with massive changes to API’s, announcements of things users oppose and other concerns. This leaves the door open to new ideas and competing social network entrepreneurs to believe there is an opportunity.

Limited Results – There are literally millions of brands and marketers using the top social networks, however few are getting real results. The lack of focus, understanding and results being achieved on the main platforms, gives way to a desire for something different that could magically change the results marketers are getting.

Human Nature – As human beings, we are programmed to often take the path of least resistance. Fight or flight as it were. Sometimes as humans, we want the easy way and sometimes something new, entices us that it could be possible.

Boredom – Also being human, we get bored easily. We are often attracted to shiny new things when we get bored and new social networks that get a lot of attention on blogs and from those we are connected to, gets the best of us. We want to be a part of the crowd and be entertained with new a new look, new capabilities and ideas.

Market Size – The overall social networking space is massive. If you come up with something that takes off in this industry, you are assured to become the next billionaire. Even though playing the lottery has better odds than that actually happening, some are allured by the chance and a new startup is born.

VC Gambling – Venture capital firms exist to invest. If they do not invest in new startups, they have no returns. Their models are based on hitting it REALLY big with a tiny percentage of the startups they invest in and losing everything on the majority. The pressure for VC’s to find and invest in the next really big thing is enormous.

When social networks are not trusted, not innovating anymore and polarize their customers and users, newcomers that hope to take advantage of that will appear. It’s that way in any industry.

Why Are Ello and Tsu Doomed?

Understanding a few of the reasons that we will continue to have so-called “Facebook killer” new networks continually popping up, is to also ask whether or not they will actually succeed, gain long-term traction or fail miserably. There are a few things to consider about the ultimately doomed fate of these two specific networks.

Polarizing Niche – Unlike the early days of Instagram and WhatsApp for example, Ello and Tsu have very tight niches that fuel their initial traction. Niches of new social networks are required if they are going to virally scale to critical mass as Pinterest, Instagram and WhatsApp have. But when the niches of these new shiny social networks are largely polarizing, it dooms the network to obscurity very quickly.

Let’s take Google Plus as an example. Starting out it was “largely” made up of two main niche groups of people, those that hated Facebook and those that were employed somehow in the social media industry, with a subgroup of Google fans that will use and love anything they produce. As we jump forward, these polarizing groups have dominated the Google Plus active user presence and prevented it from becoming mainstream, achieving critical mass and prominence.

Conversely, with Instagram and Pinterest,  the niche groups were made up of largely females and iPhone users. These early niches were not at all polarizing, enabling these two new social networks to easily grow and obtain the larger populations, thereby reaching the critical mass we see today. Neither of these two social networks were devised on negative branding or user messages against any other social networks, but rather positive features and capabilities that the industry and users clearly wanted and would use.

Both Ello and Tsu were born out of negative messaging that focuses on how other platforms suck. Although some of the points might make sense, at the end of the day shiny, new or anti-something never wins, market share does. When you look at the niche market segments of users that are attracted to these two new networks, polarizing would have to be considered an understatement.

To be clear, if you like a social network, by all means use it. But if you are doing social media marketing I suggest you focus on the ones that already have critical mass, accepted methods and reach, and leave the chasing of shiny new objects to those that have plenty of inexpensive time on their hands. Real social media marketing requires substantial knowledge, patience and consistency of proper strategies and activities.

There are no shiny objects or new networks that will magically create real results. Let those that don’t have real social media results spend their time chasing the newest shiny thing. If in the end it begins to get traction, becomes mainstream and can realize long-term sustainable results for you or your brand, then consider investing the time to add it to your mix.

7 Comments

Filed under Brand, Facebook, Instagram, Marketing, Pinterest, Social Media, Social Media Marketing, Strategy, Twitter

The 3 Most Important Factors For Growing Your Social Media Community

It seems that almost daily we come across social media marketers, enthusiasts and brands that still seem to have limited understanding of social media best practices. Often the social media “consultant” is even missing key factors in their own social presence that hinders their community, reach and growth. You’d think we would be beyond this in 2014, but sadly that is not the case.

How to grow a social communityWhen it comes to growing your social community there are three main factors that either propel or restrict your growth of your engaged, targeted audience. These three “buckets” are not the sole factors for growing a targeted audience, however they are the most important items you need to start with.

Let’s be clear and point out that the information within this post is specifically speaking to the marketer, brand or business professional that uses social media for marketing of any type. If you are social networking without a business purpose, and therefore not doing social media or social marketing, this information does not apply to you directly, however it is our professional opinion that you should still read and consider changes to what you are doing.

The 3 Most Important Factors In Community Growth:

1) Profile

One of the first things people do when you follow or friend them on a specific social network is look at your Profile. If you have not strategically completed your bio and information details properly, you are dramatically hindering the connections you make. Since there are so many social networks, we will focus on Twitter and Facebook as examples. Here are a few things you need to consider.

Twitter is one of the most informal, effective social platforms. Being human is extremely important if you’re going to be effective. Below are some of the biggest mistakes we see on Twitter profiles:

a) Privacy – If you’re doing social media, do not lock your privacy setting. Your community will never grow.

b) Profile pic – No pic, no follow. It’s that simple. Beyond making sure you have a profile pic, you need to consider whether you are an established brand or just starting out. People connect with people, not brands, logos or companies they’ve never heard of. Give them a human to connect with, rather than a logo they’ve never heard of.

c) Name – That’s great that your Twitter handle is @WhoTheHeckCares, but who are YOU? We see so many Twitter accounts with a great pic, and in the name field the person just put their Twitter handle again. Tell people your name. At the very least your first name and put it in the NAME field in Twitter. That’s why it’s there.

d) Bio – If you want people to be interested in you and what you do, make it easy for them to know you and what you do. All too often we see Twitter bio’s that contain cryptic tag lines, garbled incoherent sentences or no information at all. You need to know that you are leaving your potential followers confused and they are moving on instead of connecting with you.

Facebook is a social network with multiple profile types, such as a personal profile and business or community pages. These different account type are truly different and need to be managed as though they are. It is also extremely important to understand that business IS personal. The days of separating these two things are long gone. People do business with people, not faceless brands.

a) Personal Profile – When you lock your personal Facebook profile down, you are limiting your potential connections with prospective customers. Be sure your profile security settings let prospective connections get a sense of who you are and what you do.

b) Your BusinessfacebookprofileAll too often people add their business or employer to their profile hastily without intent. This leaves their business page not connected and opens a default Facebook profile for the mentioned company in your profile. This default tells nobody anything about the company or what it does and makes it impossible to build a following. Check your personal profile to ensure you have connected it to your business page. (see example to the right)

b) Facebook Business Pages – Fill out all of the profile information, and write it in a way that someone unfamiliar with you or your business will understand. Be sure your cover photo adds to the messaging and understanding of what you do, so when someone visits your page, they “get it” quickly and decide to connect.

2) Stream

a) Value – For the love of everything holy, you need to realize that social media is not direct sales, telemarketing or email spam. It is about earning relationships. When people check your social streams and find only content and messaging that is all about you, your brand, products or services, most will run. You must be selfless and realize it’s not about you, but your audience. Post content that they find interesting and relevant that is not about you, and you will earn the right to pitch your stuff to a receptive audience. Fail at this and you will get far fewer connections than you could.

b) Frequency – I heard a social media agency owner tell me last week that they were told that posting more than three times per day on any social platform was not a good idea. Really? Who told you that? Their response – “A social media guru that was speaking at an event we attended.”

Let me be really clear here. This is not 2005. If you are only posting 3 times a day on Twitter, Facebook, Linkedin or any other social platform, NOBODY is seeing anything you post. You have to have relevant, valuable, interesting content that YOU post, not Retweet or click Share, all day, every day. Yes, the volumes differ from platform to platform, but 3 posts isn’t the number on ANY of them.

3) Engagement

a) Conversations & Relationships – The other thing a potential social connection will typically do when reviewing your newsfeeds is look for engagement. They want to know that if they connect with you or your brand, you respond, thank, get into conversations and relationships ensue. This is SOCIAL media remember. It’s not spam media or pitch my stuff media. Be social and leverage the media and you will get many more connections and a growing social community.

When someone considering connecting with you or your brand on social media, they will unconsciously cycle through your profile, your bio and your streams. Using what they see, they quickly determine whether they want to connect with you. Focus on these three important factors and see your community grow faster than you have before.

9 Comments

Filed under Agency, Audience, Community, connection, Content, Engagement, Facebook, Followers, Marketing, Relationship, Social Media, Social Media Marketing, Twitter

Social Media: It’s Quantity AND Quality, Not Either Or

For many years I have been explaining that social media is like a freeway. The analogy here is that you must have enough cars on the road (curated posts, status updates, etc) on the freeway every day, all day, if you are going to be seen and therefore be effective. This concept is extremely important on all platforms since we know that social network users are not logged on watching their streams all day long. Whenever they log in, or step up to the side of the freeway, you want to ensure they see one of your cars flying by that is something interesting and relevant to them.

With the onset of Pay to Play, specifically on Facebook, the posting quantity element becomes even more crucial. For over two years now, we have been slowly and methodically increasing the quantity of posts we send every day and have found that there is a direct correlation with the amount of clicks, likes, comments and overall real results that this has achieved. If more people see you every day, your results will increase, as long as your posts are relevant and valuable and you don’t over do it.

social media quantity is as important as qualityWith Facebook massively constricting anything resembling organic reach for pages that are not paying to boost their posts, marketers need to increase the volume of posts they are doing to maximize the organic reach they can garner. In fact, all social media platforms are adding advertising models in order to monetize their user base. At the same time social network monetization is occurring, the volume of content being generated, posted and shared within the social graph is continually increasing at exponential levels. What that means for you is that quantity AND quality of curated and created content you post are equally important. You MUST increase the volumes you are currently posting if you are going to maintain your existing result levels, let alone increase them.

There are no surprises here. I have been saying this for years. In fact, as early as 2008, Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg defined the “Zuckerberg’s Law” about content sharing. The “law” is very similar to what many in technology known as “Moore’s Law“. Zuckerberg said, “I would expect that next year, people will share twice as much information as they share this year, and next year, they will be sharing twice as much as they did the year before…”

Last week, a friend of mine sent me the following tweet:

@brianrants –  I think @jaybaer unknowingly makes the case for @BundlePost extremely well here

In Jay’s incredible presentation he asks the question if it is time to replace the rifle with the shotgun in social media marketing. Though I definitely agree that the posting volumes have to increase dramatically if you’re going to continue to be successful, I would and have always said that it has never been an either or situation. It’s BOTH!

Conclusion:

I prefer not to use the shotgun analogy as it has more of a negative connotation to most people. The implication is that of slinging mud on the wall in the hopes that something sticks. That is not what I am saying or implying whatsoever. Rather I am saying that quality, relevant and interesting content is a requirement, every bit as much as the quantity you are posting… And now that the game has changed, the quantity needs to increase to keep pace.

I am also not going to say that paying for boosted posts is out of the question. There may be a place for that for many marketers. But again, this is not an either or scenario. Volume matters…

The social media marketing game has changed and you have to change with it or be left in the dust.

Are you aware of the changes that are impacting what you were doing?

What are you doing to work with these changes in order to continue to maintain and increase your social success?

What does all of this look like for Twitter? You need to have more than 20 relevant, valuable posts per day if you want to even be seen. And that’s a MINIMUM.

5 Comments

Filed under Content, content creation, Curation, Facebook, Marketing, Results, Social Media, Social Media Content, Social Media Management, Social Media Marketing, Twitter