Category Archives: Human

9 Characteristics Of Human, NOT Automated Social Media Marketing

Human characteristics of social media marketingThere are a few highly important things that separate big brand social media marketing from everyone else, and that is the human component. Big brands are able to focus their social media marketing on their brand, branding and advertising components that are centered around the company’s image and other major media advertising components. There is little human connection, conversation or relationship building coming out of the larger brands. The majority provide little to none selfless value and it is all about the creative and messaging, which by the way we enjoy seeing some of it.

The Big Brand Approach

As an example of how many larger brands approach social media marketing, I will share an example. I will not name the large beverage company, but I will say that I am a fan of their product and buy it regularly.

The story:

About two years ago, being a loyal consumer of a specific beverage, I decided to show my loyalty to them in social media. I mentioned them several times a week, shared pics of their packaging as I used it, etc. On a rare occasion I would receive a response or a thank you and I was good with that, but that soon completely ceased. In replace of the rare response, they began to engage ME on a weekly basis. Sounds good right? Not so fast…

The engagement I received from them, every single week hence forth was simply them tagging me about their latest news, product launch or promotion. You see, they realized I had influence within social media and decided to use me to further promote their brand. No relationship investment was every made on their part, no human connection or interest shown in me as a person or my company. Simply bold and direct promotional (spam).

They may get away with this with others, but not with me. I have completely disengaged with said brand on social and you know what? They never engaged with me again after I stopped mentioning or promoting their content. There is a difference between social media relationships and direct marketing. Most large brands do not care to understand this fact.

The Relationship Reality

At the end of the day, all non Fortune 5000 brands that are lacking the huge resources and established customer base, really need to look at and approach social media marketing very differently. Long term focus, care and gratitude with authenticity, combined with human connection is what gets results.

9 characteristics of social media marketing:

Here are just nine ways you can improve your human relationship perception in social media as well as identify other brands and connections that get it too.

1) Profile picture  – The account photo is of the real person behind the social account. This is mostly common for Twitter, Linkedin and Facebook personal accounts. However, as a brand matures on Twitter, building the brand beyond the main contacts personal image is important. Remaining human after that transition will determine how effective you are from there.

2) Profile Bio – Does their social media bio contain things about them as a person, not just a pitch for what they do? Relationships require personal connections, not just business needs. Today, business IS personal. Humanize your brand.

3) Responsive – When you mention or engage with them, do they actually respond? Do they respond in a timely manner, when you are still logged in?

4) Grateful – After sharing their content, is it met with gratitude in the form of a like, comment or reciprocation? This is something only humans do.

5) Interest – Humans show interest in others, not just themselves. Do they show interest in you and/or what you do?

6) Selfless Value – Their timeline is not just posts about them or what they do.

7) Conversations – Their timeline contains conversations with others.

8) Relevance – Their timeline contains relevant content you’re interested in, not solely their industry related things.

9) Real – A real person/personality is detectable behind the profile when you interact with them

The Perils Of Auto-pilot

The other opposite end of the spectrum from Big Brands are the newbie automation users. Those that send automated or manual sales messages as private messages on Twitter on LinkedIn, immediately or soon after connecting with them and without any relationship effort made on their part, they move right to pitching their wares. Another newbie auto-pilot tactic is using tools that tag others about your sales pitch in-stream based on something they posted previously, or any other contrived method. I could go on, but you get the idea.

The only place that in-feed or private message automation sees results is from newbies using it with/toward other newbies that do not yet know better. The brands and marketers that are using automation don’t understand social media and how relationships with long-term focus connect. Making matters worse is that new social network users who respond to these non-human automated tactics don’t either. The clicks garnered by the automation folks are short-lived and requires a constant stream of newbies in order to get traffic, clicks or results long-term.

This short sided tactic ultimately gets reported so much by more experienced users, and the reputation of automation marketers becomes clear to future new connections, so that it eventually slows and ceases to obtain even the smallest results.

Wrapping It Up

Spam is spam, whether it is done via email or within social media marketing. Failure to understand the personal, human level connection elements within this marketing medium means a lot of frustration, lack of real results and wasted time. If you are going to invest the time doing social media marketing, invest it in providing value, being human and present, while getting into conversations that build real relationships.

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Filed under advertising, Audience, automation, Brand, Community, Content, Human, Marketing, Relationship, Social Media, social media automation, Social Media Marketing, Strategy

Death and Social Media: It’s No Trick or Treat

In the social world the obsession for sharing everything is growing stronger and I feel we are losing the human touch to Social Media. Have we become so desperate for content to share that we disregard how something may affect someone?

Death And Social Media - It's No Trick or TreatFor example Death. Death and Social Media: It’s No Trick or Treat.

Ever experience the unexpected loss of a loved one? Do you remember the heartbreak you were feeling? Of course you do. That same feeling is why writing this blog post has been a difficult one for me. We know that death is never easy to accept, we also know that an unexpected death adds to the grief in numerous additional ways.

grandpaMy Grandfather would have celebrated his 98th birthday this month. Not too far fetched of a thought or possibility since my Grandmother just celebrated her 99th birthday last month with family here at my home. Grandpa passed away unexpectedly 20 years ago, long before Facebook, Twitter or even text messaging. His time came back when communication had more of a human element to it.

I received a phone call at work about Grandpa’s passing. It was a terrible shock. I remember trying to reply but no words could be spoken at the time. Just nonstop, heartbreaking sobbing and tears. I had a complete meltdown.  Writing this post brings those emotions back, something I wasn’t really prepared for. I miss him terribly and wish he was here to meet his great, great grandson. He would be proud of him, just like my grandmother is.

What does this have to do with Social Media?

I can tell you that there is no way I would have been able to handle the news via a cold, uncaring text message or social media post.

As much as a person tries to express themselves in written word it still does not hold the same sincerity, tone and emotion as when delivered via a live human voice. The delivery and timing of such an important message would make social media no trick, and certainly no treat on the matter of death. Obviously there is never a good time to receive news of an unexpected death of a loved one. However, with a phone call the messenger can get a feel as to what the person is doing and feeling at the time. To send a message via text or on social media, you have absolutely no idea where the receiver of the tragic news is or what they are doing at the time.

The social networks are certainly a way to communicate. In fact, a great way to communicate… I will never argue with anyone on that point. Just not the best form of communication when it comes to matters that deserve the all important human, emotional touch.

I think Maya Anglou stated it perfectly, “Words mean more than what is set down on paper. It takes the human voice to infuse them with deeper meaning.

Allow me to tell you of another unexpected death…. one that occurred 10 months ago and the tragic inspiration for this blog post. (Yes, it has taken 10 months to finally finish this blog)

A week before Christmas I received news that a very dear friend of mine, Peter Mah unexpectedly passed away. Unfortunately, I received the horrible news via text message. My first initial thought was … “Is this some sort of very sick joke?” I mean, I had known this man for about 20 years, my grandmother has known he and his family for even longer than that. But Peter was not just an acquaintance, I considered him family…. and he knew that.

I had a strange feeling that I should check the Facebook fanpage for the restaurant that Peter and his family owned and sure enough, there it was. I am not immediate family so I did not expect a phone call, but to this day I have no idea who actually sent me the text message. I can only imagine that someone blasted the news to everyone that was on their contact list. How impersonal and cold?

Peter didn’t own a computer, if you can imagine that. I always gave him a bad time about it, but he always did his networking face to face. No Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn. He remembered everyone and all of their personal details. He read the newspaper faithfully every single day and could hold a conversation with just about anyone, and on any topic. When it came to tech stuff like websites, online presence and smart phones, he relied on others. So the Facebook fanpage was managed by some of the employees and customers.

Here is where things got complicated and tricky. News traveled very fast about Peter’s death, so fast that his mother was one of the last to know. One of the employees explained to me that there was a man who read about the tragic loss and tried calling Peter’s mom to offer his condolences. The number that was listed was no longer in service. Thank God! He then called the restaurant asking for her correct phone number. It is then that he learned that the mother didn’t even know yet. Family was on their way into town to meet with her and give her the tragic news.

I cannot even begin to imagine the devastating heartache of losing a child. I just can’t. Can you imagine getting a phone call from someone you hardly knew, offering condolences for the loss of your child? Certainly, but hearing them say that they heard on Facebook about your child’s death, when you yourself didn’t even know yet? Believe it or not but not everyone is on Facebook or any other social platforms.

In the social world the obsession for sharing everything is growing stronger and I feel we are losing the human touch to relationships and social media. Have we become so desperate for content to share that we disregard how something may affect someone?

Death and Social Media:  It’s No Trick or Treat.

PerfectJuliaBy Julia Hull @PerfectJulia

Director of Customer Support at BundlePost

Social media marketing professional that joined the BundlePost team early in its transition from a social media agency to a software company. She is an expert in social media tools.

 

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Filed under death, Human, Social Media, Twitter