Tag Archives: social network

What 1 Billion Mobile Users On Facebook Looks Like [infographic]

At least once every month, more than 1 billion Facebook users will access the behemoth social site in 2015. There is no doubt that as consumers become even more mobile with their internet usage, Facebook will take advantage of it with mobile ad revenues that are expected to be three-quarters of their total ad income. As mobile app users have made the switch to a predominant mobile/social connection and Facebook has facilitated their business model and functionality to adjust to this, 1 billion can seem to be a small number.

Mobile internet usage, social networking access as well as social media marketing in the mobile age is changing how we do a lot of things today. In some sense it has increased our patience in normal life, since waiting on someone who is late doesn’t involve boredom and staring at the ceiling, while at the same time we expect instant gratification, responses and communication with our friends, favorite brands and vendors. But if we really considered the billion number, it may cause us to reconsider how we currently look at mobile and how it will continue to evolve.

With numbers so large being tossed around in business, banking and social media, we sometimes don’t grasp how big that number actually is. In order to truly grasp just how enormous 1 billion is, and understand the incredible impact 1 billion mobile users have on a social network, we decided to do some research on the 1 billion figure and put it into more interesting perspectives that might surprise you.

Infographic - 1 Billion Mobile Facebook Users

Before we go any further, we’d like to add that by 2016, over 2.16 billion smartphone users will exist worldwide. Coupled with what we already explained about what 1 billion looks like, it’s important to recognize how quickly these numbers scale when they are that large.

Once you are able to conceptualize the size and scale of 1 billion and relate it to the number of mobile users that are accessing Facebook, you can truly get a picture of the impact mobile is having on social networking, social media marketing and mobile advertising.

If you also consider that there is only an estimated 1.9 Billion smartphone users in the entire world, the total of 1 billion mobile Facebook users begins to appear as large as it really is.

What is your strategy to leverage the 1 billion mobile Facebook app users over the next decade?

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under ad, advertising, App, Facebook, Marketing, Mobile, Smart Phone, Social Media, Social Media Marketing

Why Ello and Tsu Entered The Social Media Scene and Why They’re Doomed

There are so many strong beliefs, perspectives and views within the social media industry, and therefore this post is going to be more controversial than we normally publish. The different “camps” of social media enthusiasts, professionals and celebrities are almost as Why Ello and Tsu came about and why they're doomedpolarized as the political parties within the United States and that means emotions can run rampant. Nevertheless, I am known for saying what needs to be said and I will attempt to do that without the emotionally charged words that often spark heated words.

There are several key reasons why new social networks like Ello and Tsu appear on the social networking scene with frequency. Having an understanding of these reasons is essential to make informed decisions on whether to chase after these numerous shiny new and incredibly distracting sites.

A Few Reasons Why Sites Like Ello and Tsu Appear

Trust – Facebook has a long history of building mistrust with its users and business customers. Constant changes, privacy issues and a lack of care or concern for their users. In recent years, Twitter has begun to make users and app developers weary with massive changes to API’s, announcements of things users oppose and other concerns. This leaves the door open to new ideas and competing social network entrepreneurs to believe there is an opportunity.

Limited Results – There are literally millions of brands and marketers using the top social networks, however few are getting real results. The lack of focus, understanding and results being achieved on the main platforms, gives way to a desire for something different that could magically change the results marketers are getting.

Human Nature – As human beings, we are programmed to often take the path of least resistance. Fight or flight as it were. Sometimes as humans, we want the easy way and sometimes something new, entices us that it could be possible.

Boredom – Also being human, we get bored easily. We are often attracted to shiny new things when we get bored and new social networks that get a lot of attention on blogs and from those we are connected to, gets the best of us. We want to be a part of the crowd and be entertained with new a new look, new capabilities and ideas.

Market Size – The overall social networking space is massive. If you come up with something that takes off in this industry, you are assured to become the next billionaire. Even though playing the lottery has better odds than that actually happening, some are allured by the chance and a new startup is born.

VC Gambling – Venture capital firms exist to invest. If they do not invest in new startups, they have no returns. Their models are based on hitting it REALLY big with a tiny percentage of the startups they invest in and losing everything on the majority. The pressure for VC’s to find and invest in the next really big thing is enormous.

When social networks are not trusted, not innovating anymore and polarize their customers and users, newcomers that hope to take advantage of that will appear. It’s that way in any industry.

Why Are Ello and Tsu Doomed?

Understanding a few of the reasons that we will continue to have so-called “Facebook killer” new networks continually popping up, is to also ask whether or not they will actually succeed, gain long-term traction or fail miserably. There are a few things to consider about the ultimately doomed fate of these two specific networks.

Polarizing Niche – Unlike the early days of Instagram and WhatsApp for example, Ello and Tsu have very tight niches that fuel their initial traction. Niches of new social networks are required if they are going to virally scale to critical mass as Pinterest, Instagram and WhatsApp have. But when the niches of these new shiny social networks are largely polarizing, it dooms the network to obscurity very quickly.

Let’s take Google Plus as an example. Starting out it was “largely” made up of two main niche groups of people, those that hated Facebook and those that were employed somehow in the social media industry, with a subgroup of Google fans that will use and love anything they produce. As we jump forward, these polarizing groups have dominated the Google Plus active user presence and prevented it from becoming mainstream, achieving critical mass and prominence.

Conversely, with Instagram and Pinterest,  the niche groups were made up of largely females and iPhone users. These early niches were not at all polarizing, enabling these two new social networks to easily grow and obtain the larger populations, thereby reaching the critical mass we see today. Neither of these two social networks were devised on negative branding or user messages against any other social networks, but rather positive features and capabilities that the industry and users clearly wanted and would use.

Both Ello and Tsu were born out of negative messaging that focuses on how other platforms suck. Although some of the points might make sense, at the end of the day shiny, new or anti-something never wins, market share does. When you look at the niche market segments of users that are attracted to these two new networks, polarizing would have to be considered an understatement.

To be clear, if you like a social network, by all means use it. But if you are doing social media marketing I suggest you focus on the ones that already have critical mass, accepted methods and reach, and leave the chasing of shiny new objects to those that have plenty of inexpensive time on their hands. Real social media marketing requires substantial knowledge, patience and consistency of proper strategies and activities.

There are no shiny objects or new networks that will magically create real results. Let those that don’t have real social media results spend their time chasing the newest shiny thing. If in the end it begins to get traction, becomes mainstream and can realize long-term sustainable results for you or your brand, then consider investing the time to add it to your mix.

7 Comments

Filed under Brand, Facebook, Instagram, Marketing, Pinterest, Social Media, Social Media Marketing, Strategy, Twitter

Social Media: It’s Quantity AND Quality, Not Either Or

For many years I have been explaining that social media is like a freeway. The analogy here is that you must have enough cars on the road (curated posts, status updates, etc) on the freeway every day, all day, if you are going to be seen and therefore be effective. This concept is extremely important on all platforms since we know that social network users are not logged on watching their streams all day long. Whenever they log in, or step up to the side of the freeway, you want to ensure they see one of your cars flying by that is something interesting and relevant to them.

With the onset of Pay to Play, specifically on Facebook, the posting quantity element becomes even more crucial. For over two years now, we have been slowly and methodically increasing the quantity of posts we send every day and have found that there is a direct correlation with the amount of clicks, likes, comments and overall real results that this has achieved. If more people see you every day, your results will increase, as long as your posts are relevant and valuable and you don’t over do it.

social media quantity is as important as qualityWith Facebook massively constricting anything resembling organic reach for pages that are not paying to boost their posts, marketers need to increase the volume of posts they are doing to maximize the organic reach they can garner. In fact, all social media platforms are adding advertising models in order to monetize their user base. At the same time social network monetization is occurring, the volume of content being generated, posted and shared within the social graph is continually increasing at exponential levels. What that means for you is that quantity AND quality of curated and created content you post are equally important. You MUST increase the volumes you are currently posting if you are going to maintain your existing result levels, let alone increase them.

There are no surprises here. I have been saying this for years. In fact, as early as 2008, Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg defined the “Zuckerberg’s Law” about content sharing. The “law” is very similar to what many in technology known as “Moore’s Law“. Zuckerberg said, “I would expect that next year, people will share twice as much information as they share this year, and next year, they will be sharing twice as much as they did the year before…”

Last week, a friend of mine sent me the following tweet:

@brianrants –  I think @jaybaer unknowingly makes the case for @BundlePost extremely well here

In Jay’s incredible presentation he asks the question if it is time to replace the rifle with the shotgun in social media marketing. Though I definitely agree that the posting volumes have to increase dramatically if you’re going to continue to be successful, I would and have always said that it has never been an either or situation. It’s BOTH!

Conclusion:

I prefer not to use the shotgun analogy as it has more of a negative connotation to most people. The implication is that of slinging mud on the wall in the hopes that something sticks. That is not what I am saying or implying whatsoever. Rather I am saying that quality, relevant and interesting content is a requirement, every bit as much as the quantity you are posting… And now that the game has changed, the quantity needs to increase to keep pace.

I am also not going to say that paying for boosted posts is out of the question. There may be a place for that for many marketers. But again, this is not an either or scenario. Volume matters…

The social media marketing game has changed and you have to change with it or be left in the dust.

Are you aware of the changes that are impacting what you were doing?

What are you doing to work with these changes in order to continue to maintain and increase your social success?

What does all of this look like for Twitter? You need to have more than 20 relevant, valuable posts per day if you want to even be seen. And that’s a MINIMUM.

5 Comments

Filed under Content, content creation, Curation, Facebook, Marketing, Results, Social Media, Social Media Content, Social Media Management, Social Media Marketing, Twitter

Social Media – Your Time Percentage Should Equate To Result Percentage

Ask yourself a few questions:

Where are you spending your time in the social graph?

What social networks get what percentage of your time and effort?

What network do your target audience spend most of their time on?

Which social network has the highest quantity and concentration of your target audience?

If you can’t answer these questions, you’re probably not being as effective with your social media marketing as you could or should be.

When a marketer or agency that is newer to social media asks me questions like, should we be on Pinterest, or should we have a brand page on Google Plus, I know right away they have a problem. You need to know where your audience spends most of their time when on social media and more importantly which social network gets the best results for your effort and time spent.

Once you know these answers, be sure your time and effort reflects the numbers. In other words, spend time on the social networks that get you the best and most results. Spend less time on the social networks that get the least or slowest results.

You’d think this would be common sense, right? Unfortunately it isn’t. I can’t tell you how many times a social media professional or marketer tells me about one of the newer or really niche social networks they love and that they spend most of their time on. My only question to them is this. How much revenue have you driven on that social network, rather than the main networks that have the highest concentration of your target market?  Sadly, one of two things usually happens:

1) They disappear and end the conversation. (BTW – this happened yesterday with someone I know personally when discussing their blog and the traffic they drive because they write about the newest shiny things and how traffic is so important. Once I asked them about revenue, poof!) Is it really that hard to understand? If you’re spending a ton of time doing something for your business it needs to get returns. Ignorance is only bliss if you won the lottery. In business you can’t ignore the obvious.

2) They justify and make excuses. Ya, but I really like it. Well, I am here to have fun too. It’s not about making money for me. These are the other responses I hear. Really?  You’re a social media marketing consultant, agency, marketer or ninja and it’s not about making money? Please stop consulting or teaching social media to anyone else!!!

Example?

Our revenues and new Bundle Post users come as a result of the following:

50% Twitter – 40% Facebook – 10% Linkedin/G+/Etc.

We spend our time and efforts in exactly these percentages, on these platforms.

For those of you that have read my stuff for a while, you know that my only goal is to help you get real results from your social media marketing. I write only about what I do that gets results, not theory or hype about the industry, new shiny distractions, etc. Don’t take any of this personally, just use it to be better.

I leave you with a mission:

Know the numbers, where your audience is and start getting real about what you are doing and where. Putting your head in the sand isn’t going to help get you results and ROI.

10 Comments

Filed under Agency, Facebook, Google Plus, Marketing, Results, Social Media, Social Media Marketing, Social Media ROI, Strategy